0

I am composing a melody for piano in Musescore, and after experimenting on a particular note with various ornaments (i.e. trills, mordents, etc.) I decided to use a 'line prall'. It sounded good, so I Googled it, hoping to find some information about it.

Nothing. Not a single relevant hit for "line prall", nor for "prall". Google has failed me.

What is a line prall (i.e. how does one play it) and are there any notable pieces in which at least one is featured?

3

Could that be another name for upper mordent? Or inverted mordent?

In music, a mordent is an ornament indicating that the note is to be played with a single rapid alternation with the note above or below. (wikipedia).

The precise meaning of mordent has changed over the years. In the Baroque period, a mordent was a lower mordent and an upper mordent was a pralltriller or schneller.

Edit

Here is a portion of the source code of MuseScore (sorry :/), which tells you how MuseScore interprets ornamentation:

    //  articulation type            set of  duration       body         repeatp      suffix
//                               styles          prefix                    sustainp
{ SymId::ornamentTurn,                any, _32nd, {},    { 1,0,-1,0 },   false, true, {} },
{ SymId::ornamentTurnInverted,        any, _32nd, {},    { -1,0,1,0 },   false, true, {} },
{ SymId::ornamentTrill,           baroque, _32nd, { 1,0 }, { 1,0 },        true,  true, {} },
{ SymId::ornamentTrill,          defstyle, _32nd, { 0,1 }, { 0,1 },        true,  true, {} },
{ SymId::brassMuteClosed,         baroque, _32nd, { 0,-1 },{ 0, -1 },      true,  true, {} },
{ SymId::ornamentMordentInverted,     any, _32nd, {},    { 0,-1,0 },     false, true, {} },
{ SymId::ornamentMordent,        defstyle, _32nd, {},    { 0,1,0 },      false, true, {} },// inverted mordent
{ SymId::ornamentMordent,         baroque, _32nd, { 1,0,1 },{ 0 },         false, true, {} },// short trill
{ SymId::ornamentTremblement,         any, _32nd, { 1,0 }, { 1,0 },        false, true, {} },
{ SymId::ornamentPrallMordent,        any, _32nd, {},    { 1,0,-1,0 },   false, true, {} },
{ SymId::ornamentLinePrall,           any, _32nd, { 2,2,2 },{ 1,0 },       true,  true, {} },
{ SymId::ornamentUpPrall,             any, _16th, { -1,0 },{ 1,0 },        true,  true, { 1,0 } },// p 144 Ex 152 [1]
{ SymId::ornamentUpMordent,           any, _16th, { -1,0 },{ 1,0 },        true,  true, { -1,0 } }// p 144 Ex 152 [1]

,{ SymId::ornamentPrecompMordentUpperPrefix, any, _16th, { 1,1,1,0 }, { 1,0 },    true,  true, {} },// p136 Cadence Appuyee [1] [2]
{ SymId::ornamentDownMordent,         any, _16th, { 1,1,1,0 }, { 1,0 },    true,  true, { -1, 0 } },// p136 Cadence Appuyee + mordent [1] [2]
{ SymId::ornamentPrallUp,             any, _16th, { 1,0 }, { 1,0 },        true,  true, { -1,0 } },// p136 Double Cadence [1]
{ SymId::ornamentPrallDown,           any, _16th, { 1,0 }, { 1,0 },        true,  true, { -1,0,0,0 } },// p144 ex 153 [1]
{ SymId::ornamentPrecompSlide,        any, _32nd, {},    { 0 },          false, true, {} }

 // [1] Some of the articulations/ornaments in the excursions table above come from
// Baroque Music, Style and Performance A Handbook, by Robert Donington,(c) 1982
// ISBN 0-393-30052-8, W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

// [2] In some cases, the example from [1] does not preserve the timing.
// For example, illustrates 2+1/4 counts per half note.

(rendermidi.cpp)

It has the same body as the trill which seems to indicate an excursion of 1 semi-tone up repeated, but I have to say I do not get the prefix/ suffix part, which are different… Wild guess: excursion of two semi-tones before for the line prall? Anyway, this is just MuseScore interpretation…

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Found the correlation using DuckDuckGo ;) – Tom Jun 25 at 20:38
  • Except Musescore has an up prall, a down prall, a prall prall, a line prall, and more. I would specifically like to know what a line prall is. Thanks anyway, though. – Micah Windsor Jun 25 at 20:55
  • Isn't it another way of writing it? – Tom Jun 25 at 21:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.