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Is there a name for the non-cord tone that is described as: an approached by step and then a leap in the same direction?

As in (suppose the key of D minor): F-G-D, or D-C#-F?

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    I would be inclined to call it an incomplete neighbor unless there is a more convincing interpretation given context (for example, a 5-6 exchange). – Jake Grossman Oct 12 at 23:24
  • @JakeGrossman IMO, you should add that as an answer. I suggest also mentioning it being an unresolved dissonance. – Aaron Oct 12 at 23:33
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I would be inclined to call it an incomplete neighbor unless there is a more convincing interpretation given context (for example, a 5-6 exchange).

Let's take your example, for instance.

incomplete neighbor example

Now take a look at the following:

complete neighbor example

You can see how in this example, the G does resolve back to the F. In both your example and this modified example, the G is acting as a neighbor tone to the F, but in the case of the former, the dissonance is unresolved. This is considered an incomplete neighbor.

Music isn't so black and white however. A slight modification to your example:

5-6 exchange example

Is this still an incomplete neighbor? You could reasonably argue that yes, it is. However, it could instead be interpreted as a 5-6 exchange, a common paradigm during the common practice period, and I think that feels like a more convincing interpretation. Neither analysis is wrong per se, but one could argue that one is more convincing than the other.

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