0

If I virtually (via a DAW) hit the snare, kick and ride at the same moments in a pop-rock song is that hard or challenging for seasoned drummers in case I wanted to play this song live? I would imagine since the kick is controlled by the foot you could easily pull the rest of the 2 that are controlled with your arms and wrists.

Also professionally is the simultaneous use of both kick and snare not professional or isn't generally considered to sound good.. Should I instead use only snare and the ride at those moments for example.

I know one answer for this question would be "Just listen!" but I want to consider the ergonomics and tradition of all this..

1
  • 1
    There are many videos of drummers doing this on youtube. Have a look, and even if it's not easy to hear, it's easier to see.
    – Tim
    Oct 13 '20 at 8:13
4

This is the basic element of any 'four on the floor' rhythm [though more usually with hi-hat rather than ride].

boom-tsh-thwack-tsh-boom-tsh-thwack-tsh-…

Kick on the one & three, snare and kick on the two & four. Hats or ride playing 8s.

Not a problem at all to hit these three together.

4

James Brown's drummers are considered some of the best of all time, and they definitely hit the kick and snare and ride at the same time occasionally. The main drum riff for the verses of "Superbad" (played by Jabo Starks) has kick and snare simultaneously at the first beat of every measure.

And check out the bridge (1:30) with kick, snare, and cymbal together.

1
  • Thanks @Aaron for the edit assist! Check out that squeaky kick pedal also! Oct 13 '20 at 7:16
0

Just to give another great example. I love Jonathan Moffett's kick and snare at the same time in 'Beat it'. You can clearly see it from 0:27 - 0:30. Every other snare hit is backed up by kick.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.