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What is Battuta and does it only apply to voice leading by contrary motion?

For example, in treble clef, if going from "E-G" (major-tenth - that is, the "E" is in the bass and the "G" is in the soprano,) and then move the "E" up to a "G" by oblique motion, would that constitute Battuta?

Transferred from: Few Questions on Counterpoint in the Tradition of Johan Fux

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Battuta translates to "beaten" in English. In counterpoint, it is when an octave is approached from the "outside -> in", that is from the interval of a tenth as opposed to a sixth.

I would contend that approaching an octave through oblique motion would not necessarily be battuta, but in fact would just be lazy counterpoint. Instead of skipping up to a "G" the lower voice could easily skip up to a "B" and continue consonance, rather than support a technically correct but otherwise erstwhile prematurely conceived octave cadence.

Transferred from: Few Questions on Counterpoint in the Tradition of Johan Fux

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