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I'm puzzled by the following. It seems to imply that "non-calibrated" strings are a good idea.

Steinberger double-ball strings have, as the name suggests, string balls at both ends of the string. This makes them ultra-easy to install on Steinberger instruments using the front-mounted tailpiece and headless tuning system.

The double-ball non-calibrated design ensures easy installation and contributes to the reputable Steinberger tuning stability. This particular Light-gauge pack is designed for Steinberger’s 6-string guitars. https://www.andertons.co.uk/steinberger-6-string-doubleball-guitar-strings-light

Here's a definition of calibrate

4: to adjust precisely for a particular function
5: to measure precisely
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/calibrated

You would think that calibration is a good thing.

Is there some special meaning of non-calibrated when referring to guitar strings?

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  • I’m only guessing that earlier steinberger models might have required calibrated strings which would likely have been more expensive. So it could be a positive marketing point to support non-calibrated strings on current guitars. Jan 3 at 21:41
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    There are calibrated strings for trans-trem. When you think about it, it makes sense that having specific string gauges and lengths might be required to make the trans trem system work as intended: sweetwater.com/store/detail/SST106--steinberger-sst-106 Jan 3 at 21:44
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The term is related to Steinberger's TransTrem tremolo system, which requires strings of a specific length to work properly- the strings are "calibrated" for use with this system. Any other set of strings would then be "non-calibrated", and the strings are marked as such so TransTrem users don't buy the wrong set.

Here is another information page.

And a quote from one reseller explains it (emphasis added):

The "STP" series are specially calibrated for the TransTrem transposing tremolo system used on the vast majority of existing original USA-built Steinberger GL, GP, and GM series guitars. These strings feature two standard ball-ends and are built to exacting lengths to ensure accurate functioning and tuning of the TransTrem tremolo version #2.

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  • Thanks for solving that - I have a Steinberger Spirit. When I depress the arm, the chord goes out of tune. I wasn't particularly worried about that. I'm now wondering if I were to buy the calibrated strings, the chord would stay in tune despite the pitch bend. The bridge assembly is simply marked as .*"Steinberger System - Under license - Pat. Pending."* - I'll see if I can follow this up myself but any insights from others would be appreciated. Jan 4 at 19:19
  • Thanks for solving that - I have a Steinberger Spirit (should have mentioned that earlier!). When I depress the arm, the chord goes out of tune. I wasn't particularly worried about that. I'm now wondering if I were to buy the calibrated strings, the chord would stay in tune despite the pitch bend. The bridge assembly is simply marked as .*"Steinberger System - Under license - Pat. Pending."* - I'll see if I can follow this up myself but any insights from others would be appreciated. Here's a pic.gak.co.uk/en/… Jan 4 at 19:26

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