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For some months I've been quite obsessed with the sound of some djent metal groups.

Bought a 7-string guitar with the largest scale length I could afford along with an 8 string pack, the thickest one being a .80. I did not reach my desired note at all; still quite happy with the guitar.

I'm still willing to spend more if that would get me to my desired note, but I'm really having a hard time understanding what I'm missing and by how much.

The 7-string had a 686 / 648 mm scale length (fanned frets), and I was using a .80 string.

The tuning I was aiming for seems to be: C F C F A# D G

I'm no music expert at all but I think that's a C1. Could I achieve that with some bass strings? Do I need a different (longer scale, baritone) guitar, or do djent players only achieve this with post-processing effects?

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    Are you sure they're actually tuning to C1? It's certainly possible, but I don't know of a single song tuned that low, and drop C at C2 is an incredibly common metal tuning.
    – Edward
    Jan 22, 2021 at 2:54
  • Yes, nik solved my doubts youtube.com/watch?v=kj49Fl1moEQ, i was mainly interested in "within the ruins"
    – Nanoc
    Jan 22, 2021 at 9:46
  • .84 is very heavy for any string! Do you mean 0.084"?
    – Tim
    Jan 22, 2021 at 9:59
  • true, i checked the string pack, it is a Ernie Ball 2624, 9-80 isn´t it a .80 then? indeed it is very heavy but seems like it´s not enought
    – Nanoc
    Jan 22, 2021 at 10:30
  • C1 would be a (rather low) bass note, so maybe you need a six string bass? You'll never get there on any neck with common guitar scale-lengths. Are you sure C1 is the note you are actually hearing played (by the guitar)? Jan 25, 2021 at 15:22

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You're talking about tuning to double-drop c on a seven-string, which is the equivalent of playing drop F on a six-string. It's technically doable, but there's a better tool for the job. Realistically you should buy a nine-string if you want to play double-drop music and can afford one.

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