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I am a beginner guitar player. I found a youtube tutorial to play a song. So the chords I was playing for the song were: Dm, Gm, A7, F, E7 .

I was asked by someone to transpose the key to C# instead of playing it in Fm. Also, he asked to work to Ab Major Chord progression and bring it down to an E Major Chord progression.

So, here's my question:

  1. What I know till now is Dm, Gm, F and belongs to the F Major chord progression, so how does it relate to F minor?

  2. I was asked by someone to transpose the key to C# instead of playing it in Fm. Also, he asked to work to Ab Major Chord progression and bring it down to an E Major Chord progression : What did that exactly mean? I know a little bit of transposing the key where we see the chord degree in the chord progression and in the key that we want to play, we use the same degree. But didn't exactly understand the above part.

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  • I think the original key is F major, not F minor. Also, I don't understand this sentence: "Also, he asked to work to Ab Major Chord progression and bring it down to an E Major Chord progression" - hopefully someone else will. Is that a direct quote? If it is, you might have to go back to the person requesting the changes and ask for clarification. – Todd Wilcox May 3 at 12:43
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    It would appear that your asker is asking some things which are confusing. Maybe he is confused? It was never in Fm anyhow. Transposing to key C#? Major or minor? Ab major and E major don't make any sense either! Those chords quoted could belong to key Dm, with E7 being V/V, but they're more likely not to be perceived as in a major key. As it stands, the question is unanswerable. By the way, what's the song? – Tim May 3 at 13:12
  • Can you add link to the tutorial you mention? I can't figure out where the misunderstanding comes from otherwise. – user1079505 May 3 at 16:59
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Your question is really unclear, but I'll take a stab at it.

The chords Dm, Gm, A7, F, E7 aren't in the key of Fm, but they could be in the key of Dm (Dm = i, Gm = iv, A7 = V7, F = II, E7 = V/V). And the key of Dm is relative to the key of F major. That means it has pretty much the same notes, but it doesn't have to have exactly the same notes - F major doesn't have a C#, which is needed for the A7 chord, but D harmonic minor does. So my guess for the first part is that you're confusing the relative major key of F with the key of D minor.

For the second part, the key of F minor is relative to the key of Ab major. So there might be the same sort of confusion going on.

And finally, if you move from Dm to Fm (the keys relative to F major and Ab major) you're going down by a minor third. If you go down a minor third from E major, you'll be in C# minor, which you also mention in your question. And C# minor happens to be relative to E major.

Based on the way you've presented things, it looks like you're being asked to transpose down a minor third.

But I think the best thing for you to do is to learn about the relationships between relative major and minor keys. Once you get that you'll either have the answer to your question or you'll be able to phrase it differently so we'll be able to give you some insight.

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  • However - key Dm doesn't have G#, as in the E7 chord. But Dm does seem a likely candidate. – Tim May 3 at 13:54
  • Thanks a lot for the answer. As you mentioned, I need to go through the relative minor and major to understand it better. Anyways thanks for taking the time to help :) – pranami May 3 at 15:17
  • @Tim - absolutely. That's why I labeled it the V/V - no matter what key you're in it's going to have a note from outside the scale – Tom Serb May 3 at 16:37

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