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I was looking at sheet music for Scriabin's Sonata No.2 in G-sharp Minor, and came across this interesting notation I'd never seen before. The piece is written in three-halves time signature. I was wondering if someone could explain what this is and how to play it.

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They should be played together. They're just spaced oddly like that to accommodate the presence of both E and E#.

The reason it's E and E# (as opposed to, say, E and F) is because of the previous E-F# dyad. For the notation in question, the E is a repeat of the previous E, and the E# is the lower neighbor to the F#s on either side.

Looking at it as two separate voices, one voice sings E-E, and the other voice sings F#-E#-F#.

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