1

score excerpt with four measures of an arpeggiated chord

What is the best fingering for the attached sheet music marked in blue (right hand part)?

8
  • You didn't attach anything
    – Duston
    May 7 at 13:14
  • 1
    What composition is this excerpt from? May 7 at 15:00
  • @AndrewChin's question is important: the best fingering might be influenced things like speed or whether pedal is stylistically appropriate for the piece. It also would be helpful to know what you've tried, or if there are specific aspects of the passage that give you trouble.
    – Aaron
    May 7 at 15:12
  • You could at least give the tempo. But I'd be curious about the composition to know whether it's from a notable piano composer. The lack of any expression/phrasing markings just seems a bit suspect. May 7 at 15:19
  • Best for whom? This cannot be answered other than personally. My best fingering could leave others floundering - and vice versa. The tempo is missing, and it's probably one of the most important factors for fingering decisions. And what have you tried so far?
    – Tim
    May 7 at 16:15
2

Noticing that the part in question is just an F major broken chord ascending in various inversions, if you don't want to shift hand position too much you might wanna try something like 1335 1225 354 1225 133525 On the other hand if you don't like repeating the same finger for repeated notes, maybe try 1435 1325 354 1325 132425 or something like that. It really depends on which notes you want to play legato and where you wanna have a small gap between notes, as well as how strong or soft you can play with each of your fingers, how you want to execute the passage musically, etc.

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  • Thanks guys! I’m only a beginner, a self taught learner. At moment I am learning this piece, this is the ending, I had my fingering but would like to check it with some experts. Now You have answered my question. Thanks so much! May 8 at 1:21
  • Typically you do not want to repeat notes using the same finger (the articulation is much more difficult), so I think the first suggestion is not really right. Also note that the left hand is moving up close to the right hand for the first phrase so if you don't move your right hand as you go along you will find your hands interfering with each other.
    – JimM
    May 8 at 11:26
  • @JimM It would depend on the piece and your interpretation of it. Sometimes it's better to not change fingerings, especially when you're not trying to play super fast and want to achieve a certain articulation, which sometimes may be easier with same-finger repeated notes. Also interfering hands doesn't seem to be too much of a problem. There are a lot of repertoire which requires interlocking hands playing chords and stuff.
    – Divide1918
    May 9 at 3:48

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