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I'm trying to play "No Roots" by Alice Merton and Nicolas Rebscher in an intermediate rendition. Left and right hand definitely doable on their own and I can also play them together as far as the sequence of key press and release is concerned. But I cannot properly keep up the rhythm.

This is the hardest part (you can play it as a loop if you like):

The hardest part

I have the full piece from here: https://www.sheetmusicdirect.com/se/ID_No/124405/Product.aspx

Here is me playing the pictured part in a loop: https://soundcloud.com/user-360061256-960257477/no-roots-bars-7-and-8/s-MSIDE2w5GiA

Do any of you have specific tips on how to practice? So far I have practiced each hand on its own, each hand to the official recording and also both hands together.

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  • I think in the answers to the question Aaron mentions are enough suggestions to get you started. I would suggest slow(!) metronome practice, hands seperate and together, at the same metronome number.
    – Tim H
    Jun 14, 2021 at 11:53

2 Answers 2

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Two things:

  • Practice each hand separately with a metronome until the timing is spot on
  • Count out loud in 16th notes when you practice separately and together so your mouth is telling each hand when to play each note

You don’t exactly need independence, you need the hands to line up when they are supposed to and also play notes that aren’t lined up but have to be at the right point in time.

For true independence, you really need to practice separately so that you can have at least one hand play its part while you think about the other.

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This may be a little unconventional but since this is basically a rhythm issue and both parts are single lines (no chords) I consolidated the rhythms into a single stave and added indications for left and right hands (or fingers). It makes it very easy to see and play rhythmically. After tightening up the feel and getting comfortable with this just add the pitches, which you already have worked out.

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