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I know that V43 is a better option but the exercise I am doing does not allow me the option of inverted 7 chords. Can someone please correct me if I have made a mistake?

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  • Related question given the nature of armani's proposed part-writing solution here: music.stackexchange.com/questions/118251/…
    – Dekkadeci
    Nov 3, 2021 at 12:34
  • Dekka that is not the same at all. In the other question I thought it might be nice to get a list of exceptions going ... that is a general question regarding those two intervals, it just happens to use that progression.
    – user35708
    Nov 3, 2021 at 14:33
  • are the 2notes in the bass line also eighth notes? Are the Roman numbers given or is this your task? If you are free you can treat the melody note C in B-C-D as passing tone. Dec 4, 2021 at 12:26

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I don't see any problems here! You obviously can't double the F♯, and doubling the bass A would lead to parallels, so your only option is to double the C.

But there is one caveat: some traditions are really strict about motion from a diminished fifth to a perfect fifth, and thus they may view the upper-voice motion (soprano and tenor) moving into the I6 to be an error. I don't remember what Aldwell and Schachter say, but you'll want to clarify that they "allow" this if you're trying to follow that book exactly.

For me, I see this motion far too often in the literature to treat it as a part-writing error. There are chords later on where you can't resolve the tritone "correctly," and for that reason I personally think outlawing d5–P5 motion is pretty unnecessary.

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  • They say that because of the parallel 10ths in the outer voices the D5 is allowed to move to a P5.
    – user35708
    Nov 3, 2021 at 10:59
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Depends on what the grader is looking for, but unfortunately I do see indirect crossed voices with the alto voice going to the C which crosses the soprano's B in the first beat. I to vii6 is quite tricky for sure.

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