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I finally got some time to pick up on my guitar skills, but after cleaning it and then proceeding to change the strings, I noticed that the bridge pins and the bridge looked weird , and almost like that they could break if the strings were too tight. Are they gonna break and should I get them checked out?

The images: https://i.stack.imgur.com/E8LAs.jpg

Edit: looked like I was only concerned about the bridge pins.

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  • I would be more concerned about the bridge. It looks like someone used a screwdriver to get the pins out. As long as the pins stay in while you are playing, you should be okay. If you break one or lose one, they are easy to replace.
    – ToastMan
    Dec 7, 2021 at 14:42

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Just in time! The pins will split the bridge when all the tension is on. It's already partially happened, sadly.

Some options:

Very carefully with a sharp chisel, work under the bridge until it's off as cleanly as possible, and get a replacement, stuck back on as exactly as you can, using two-part epoxy. Maybe consider a brass compensated saddle at the same time?

Try to open op the split gently, to dribble two-part epoxy in everywhere you can - including the pin holes (re-drill later), and carefully clamp the brige back together, which may not be possible if the lower shoulder of the bridge is too chamfered.

I recently did the first on a 12 string, and it's absolutely fine now. (Original owner used 4 drywall fixings, which strangely didn't do too good a job... Buy a bridge that's at least the same size, slightly longer/wider is better, but will entail more work cutting the lacquer away to give in a tidy, tight fit - and look good again. Good luck!

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    Thank you, I will probably try to get it fixed it at a workshop, if there are any nearby. Can you enlighten me on why this is happening, as I don't actually play my guitar that often, like just a few times every few months or so. And would you happen to know how much it would cost to get it fixed?
    – Gr8Bedo
    Dec 7, 2021 at 16:16
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    @Gr8Bedo Yeah, I was gonna say, "Or another option, take it to a good luthier." And I'm sure they'd be able to quote you. There could even be other, related issues they find. Dec 7, 2021 at 16:21
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    If you fancy some diy, give it a go. Most repairs are worth doing, but there are plenty of folk who would write off this due to the effort involved. I wouldn't do someone else's repair like this for less than a couple of hrs labour, probably 3 or 4, by the time it's all tidied up. So if the guitar's worth less than, say, $100, its not worth doing - unless there's a lot of sentimental value involved.
    – Tim
    Dec 7, 2021 at 16:30
  • I do fancy DIY, and honestly I would love to repair it, but knowing myself I might mess it up one way or another. And the guitar is worth around a 100$, but I still think getting it repaired is the way to go as I come from a third-world country, and art like this isn't valued much, infact I got a guitar that had it's neck splitting away from its fretboard (not sure if that is the right way to describe it) fixed for 10$. I would update you on my final decision if you are interested. And once again, thank you for all the help.
    – Gr8Bedo
    Dec 7, 2021 at 16:43
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    Please let me know what happens in the end. Good luck - but it won't be a cheap repair!
    – Tim
    Dec 7, 2021 at 17:15

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