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i read a part of book of Theory of Harmony (i'm not read entire book because just some guy scanning book for me for answer my question)

and i saw so many weird resolution and preparing of 7 tone in 7 chord

1. first of all, Can the 7th note not move and can be resolved by becoming a consonant in the next chord? (i'll not show image to this, cause in the book, every chord is have this case)

2. can 7th note resolved by Skip?

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and that cases show 7th note can resolved by skip. But I don't know why, and if it's possible for certain chords or for all chords.

3. can 7th note appearing by skip?(in the book that case is called 'half preparing')

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(second image is major too.)

same question for this case. I don't know why can, and if it's possible for certain chords or for all chords.

4. what case is this in IV7?

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it just look like a my first question. but that resolution is called 'IV7's independent usage' (i'm not exactly. cause that word is write different language, not english)

What kind of special progression is this? Is there something else? why called this independent usage or someting like that.

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  • 2
    Who is the author of the book you are reading? It would also help if you provided the page and chapter (and subchapter if there is one) of the images you gave as examples. May 9, 2022 at 11:16
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    Case (3) is treating the dissonant seventh by a standard procedure called suspension. It requires that the dissonance first appears as a consonance (the third of a I, in the example) then remain 'held' while the others notes move to make it a dissonance (as in the IV7) and the resolve stepwise (the V2). May 9, 2022 at 11:19
  • the book is write by korean language. and i know what suspension is. i'm only asking what is 'IV7's independent usage' mean. but people can't figure it out from that image
    – guss2222
    May 9, 2022 at 13:59
  • And I wrote the wrong number in the text. The number of questions you answered is 4.
    – guss2222
    May 9, 2022 at 14:08
  • anyway he not tald me who is the author of the book .
    – guss2222
    May 9, 2022 at 14:22

3 Answers 3

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  1. first of all, Can the 7th note not move and can be resolved by becoming a consonant in the next chord? (i'll not show image to this, cause in the book, every chord is have this case)

Yes.

Here is a good example of it in a common sequence...

enter image description here

...all the sevenths are held to become (to resolve to) thirds in the next chords.

  1. can 7th note resolved by Skip?

Yes.

I think the point is to first understand the strict treatment of dissonance according to the "learned style" contrapuntal rules, then to understand that to follow or not follow those strict rules becomes an artistic choice.

A particular case comes to mind. Ralph Kirkpatrick discusses the unconventional handling of dissonance and seventh chords in the keyboard music of Domenico Scarlatti in his book Domenico Scarlatti. He points out how Scarlatti frequently would leave dissonant sevenths "hanging" where a full dominant seventh chord could resolve to just the tonic in octaves. He also describes Scarlatti transposing voices into different octaves. So a dissonant seventh in one voice might be resolved by the third, but with that third being in a different octave that then seventh. Those are examples of either resolving by "leap" or simply not resolving by strict resolution. You might also consider them resolution by implied harmony.

If you apply that concept from Kirkpatrick to your first example, you would say the resolution of E5 is displaced to the octave below with D4 rather than the convention D5.

enter image description here

When you have a few centuries of musical culture based on the harmony of V7 I, you don't always need to literally resolve the seventh of V7 to understand the tonic played in octaves represents a full tonic triad. In other words, you could say the listener's understanding dominant to tonic harmony is more important that the details of chord voicing and voice leading. You could extend that to other harmonies like the subdominant or the secondary, modal chords of a key.

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  • I appreciate so much. but here is late night right now. I will check later. .
    – guss2222
    May 9, 2022 at 15:42
  • that's not good example for first question. here e.g 'C'-F-D-A (II)-> 'C'-C-E-G(I) . and 7th in II (C) resolve by becoming a consonant in the next chord.
    – guss2222
    May 10, 2022 at 3:17
  • And question 2. even if there is no resolution note in the other octave part, it is resolved by skip. check the 4th image in second question in main text.
    – guss2222
    May 10, 2022 at 3:24
  • How is it not a good example? It's exactly the situation you described: each dissonant seventh is held and those held notes becomes consonant in the next chord. May 10, 2022 at 17:43
  • I think you may be going about your harmony study the wrong way. Don't go about it piecemeal from what someone gives you online. Get a good textbook. Read the entire book. Compare the teaching of the textbook to real scores. Don't get sidetracked with lots of questions before finishing the book and studying real scores. Keep the general understanding books teach what is conventional, but not absolutely strict rules. There is not a rule for every musical movement. May 10, 2022 at 17:47
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To know if a particular harmony device can or can not be used depends on a musical context or on a pedagogical context. Nothing is forbidden a priori in music, at least not after we have gone through the 20th century, so the answer to the four questions must be "yes, you can", unless you can provide more context.

If those are examples in the book you are reading, it is probably safe to assume that they are correct, given that pedagogical context. I have not seen examples like (1), (2) or (3) in other harmony textbooks, although I know that in Schoenberg's Theory of Harmony resolving dissonances by skip is eventually allowed under certain constraints. Case (2) is probably called 'half-preparing' because a 'full-preparing' would require that the dissonance was also introduced by stepwise motion, in the same direction as the resolution, resulting in it being considered a 'passing tone'. The 'full-preparing' way of dealing with the dissonance is standard in harmony textbooks. In case (4) the dissonant seventh is treated by a another standard procedure called suspension. It requires that the dissonance first appears as a consonance (the third of a I, in the example) then remain 'held' while the others notes move to make it a dissonance (as in the IV7) and then resolve stepwise (the V2). I don't know what 'IV7 independent usage' means in that context, though.

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  • i really appreciate. but i wait for another answer
    – guss2222
    May 9, 2022 at 15:09
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There is not one single theory of harmony in music. The goal of music theory is to describe what musicians and composers are doing and to explain the music in a system of rules. Rules often have been derived from the practice - sometimes rules have been postulated by composers or other authorities - like the church fathers

There was a time where a dissonance had to be prepared and the resolution of the leadtone had to be into the octave and skips should be avoided. But such rules were not lasting for eternity.

IV7- iii -V2 can be understood as a cadence were iii is a substitution of V13.

If you read a book of harmony you always have to mind the social and historic context.

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