1
  1. Are there advanced high-quality violins with 4 fine tuners? (like Stradivarius.)

  2. Are there advanced violin concerto virtuosos players using violins with 4 fine tuners?

Below are some related previous discussions.

But I see no definite reasons why not to have advanced high-quality violins with 4 fine tuners. If we care about the difference between 440 and 442 Hz, why not use fine tuners to make perfect pitches for all G,D,A, not just E strings?

1 fine tuner:

enter image description here

4 fine tuners:

enter image description here

3
  • Don't forget geared machine heads at the other end.
    – Tim
    Commented Sep 4, 2022 at 17:15
  • 2
    The posted video is a bit misleading. Fine tuners really have very little to do with the quality of the strings, and nothing to do with the quality of the instrument itself. Which means this is really a duplicate of the other question linked here: it simply becomes a question of advantages and disadvantages. I'll add a bit to the existing answers over there. (By the way, the close-vote under the "gear recommendation" category seems odd. I don't think the poster is seriously shopping for a Strad. ;) Commented Sep 4, 2022 at 18:32
  • 1
    The fine tuner is not part of the violin, but either a device that can be screwed into the tailpiece or in fact be integrated into the tailpiece. Thus you can use any violin with four fine tuners. It is usually not done as they negatively affect the sound. It is common to see fine tuners on the E string or E and A strings, as that one is particularly hard to tune.
    – Lazy
    Commented Sep 4, 2022 at 21:16

2 Answers 2

2

Are there advanced high-quality violins with 4 fine tuners? (like Stradivarius.)

"Stradivarius" is not a violin brand but a violin maker from the 17th/18th century. Fine tuners are part of the setup that is at the choice and whim of the player. Nobody used them at that time and they would have been comparatively pointless given the rather modest ability of the gut strings of that time to hold a stable pitch as well as their comparative flexibility and lower tension, meaning that the little range of movement of a modern fine tuner would not have done a whole lot.

Stradivarius violins have been reengineered for modern string materials and tensions. Part of their modern fame is due to them taking rather well to this reengineering compared to other master violins from the same era.

The player of such a violin will make the decision what kind of tuners and pegs (and tailpiece and fingerboard and chin rest and other personal/wear elements) they want to have their instrument equipped with. It's not the call of any manufacturer to make though luthiers/violin makers will be able to make qualified suggestions.

1
  • 1
    'Stradivarius is not a brand' - why does mine have that written inside it then?
    – Tim
    Commented Sep 5, 2022 at 6:36
1

Are there advanced high-quality violins with 4 fine tuners? (like Stradivarius.)

No

Are there advanced violin concerto virtuosos players using violins with 4 fine tuners?

No

If we care about the difference between 440 and 442 Hz, why not use fine tuners to make perfect pitches for all G,D,A, not just E strings?

If you've ever watched orchestra level violinists tune their instruments you'll know that they never get out their electronic tuners to get exactly the right number of Hertz for each string. They first tune the A string by ear according to a reference pitch supplied by one of the other instruments and then they generally tune the other strings, again by ear, to fifths.

A fine tuner is needed/useful for the thin, steel E string because tighten too much and it is easily snapped. The other strings are more robust and tolerate accidental over tightening via pegs much better.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.