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Given that the middle pedal, when there is a middle one, has a very different use on each side of the Atlantic - sustain on the left, practice on the right- and it features in some answers on this site, it would be good to find out what sort of proportions exist. I guess most grand pianos might have a sostenuto,(?) but the split for uprights (studio pianos)? And where in the world is there a proliferation of what?

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    Wait what? Can you be more clear about this middle pedal difference? Almost every acoustic and digital piano I’ve played that has a middle pedal has a middle pedal that does the exact same thing: sostenuto - holds up the dampers that are up when the pedal is pressed. I’ve only ever seen one kind of (upright) piano that does anything different. Nov 15 at 13:29
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    @AndyBonner - I've only ever come across pianos where the right pedal is damper - for sustain, and left is the 'quiet' pedal - so -called una corda, a misnomer on uprights, but there we go. It's the middle that's in contention, in my experience only the choice between practice and sostenuto. So, yes, 4 uses, only 3 pedals... Unless someone knows better!
    – Tim
    Nov 15 at 14:09
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    Right is always sustain, left is always ‘soft’, though this is achieved differently on grand and upright pianos. I have known several upright studio pianos (meaning located in a recording studio) where the middle pedal introduced not a felt damper but a set of ‘jangle’ strips, for the ‘honky-tone’ sound.
    – Laurence
    Nov 15 at 15:52
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    Not sure if Yamaha uprights with the practice felt are a European thing, they might just be a Yamaha educational thing. Practice rooms at one Virginia university had those last time I was there. Are you asking only about uprights? If so this question makes more sense to me. Uprights seem to have strange alternatives to sostenuto. I guess the upright action doesn’t work as well for sostenuto? Or maybe upright players aren’t good enough to use it? Nov 15 at 20:20
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    @ToddWilcox - seems like you've found the answer. Don't leave it just as a comment!
    – Tim
    Nov 16 at 9:33

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