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Looking at this sheet music, I would have played E and G but he plays C and E. Is there something I don't understand?

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Thanks

Reference :

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    It's probably just a mistake in the sheet music.
    – Aaron
    Commented Jun 8, 2023 at 19:04
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    Because no one is actually obligated to play exactly what's written; they can change notes if they want and no one will arrest them. That's especially true if you're the composer. A separate (more useful?) question is "Which version is 'right,'" or "which version should I use." In this case, the played version seems more likely, since it provides the entire C chord instead of doubling the fifth. Commented Jun 8, 2023 at 19:38
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    I’m voting to close this question because "why did [anyone] choose to do [anything]" is too speculative to answer. Commented Jun 8, 2023 at 19:39
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    Well technically it's his own sheet music so it's most probably a mistake since there would be no reason why somebody would record themselves on youtube and proposing to buy the sheet music if the sheet music isn't the same as one the youtube video. Anyway! Thanks for confirming guys.
    – Guest
    Commented Jun 8, 2023 at 20:44
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    @Guest That clarifies things. This is extremely common — the YouTube performer records a piece, then later writes it down, near always with mistakes. There is plenty of Q&A on this site where others have encountered the same propblem.
    – Aaron
    Commented Jun 8, 2023 at 21:05

3 Answers 3

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In this case, the video confirms that it's a misprint. It's C and E.

E and G would be musically possible, but unlikely, if only because the right hand is already playing the G.

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It is most likely simply a stylistic choice. The general chord this section is built around appears to be C major, so playing C and G is a perfectly reasonable (if not BETTER) choice to make. In the future, however, realize that sheet music is not an end all be all. The answer to your question is quite honestly "why not".

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To elaborate a bit on Laurence's answer, there are several questions on this site concerning keyboard music that appears to call for the same note to be played simultaneously by both hands (or by one hand while the other is holding it down having already played it), so this isn't per se a red flag. In those cases, however, it's because of a desire to show that the same note belongs to two different musical ideas that happen to overlap at that point. In this case, the left hand part especially is not particularly melodic. Furthermore, the instruction "with ped" means that the G will not sound any different whether it is held as a quarter note or a half note.

In this case, as it is an arrangement, I would tend to view the original as "correct." If you listen to the soundtrack (for example in the trailer, below), you'll find that there's definitely a C in the first chord.

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  • I think usually when I see this happen in sheet music, one of the parts will have the note-head in parentheses, just to indicate "Yeah, the other hand's got this." An exception might be when it's music scored for an organ, harpsichord, or other instrument with multiple manuals, in which case you can hit the note with both hands at once. Commented Jun 9, 2023 at 17:19

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