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Schoenberg says that the harmony of a motive may be changed ''[b]y additions at the end'' (Fundamentals of musical composition, page 10). He cites examples 25c-i to illustrate what he means (see picture). Can someone please spell out for me how examples 25c-i illustrate what Schoenberg thinks they illustrate?

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    There are examples of harmonizing of a similar phrase, using a different chord at the end of each time. The chord harmonic function is written under the score. Which part exactly needs clarification? Sep 28, 2023 at 16:16
  • Point taken -- the end is being changed. If you're right that that's all that Schoenberg is pointing to, then your comment is a complete answer to my question. As to why I was confused: I suppose that if the fact that a different chord is used at the end of each of the examples 25c-i is all that Schoenberg is pointing to with this example, then I would have expected him to say that the harmony of a motive may be changed "by changing the last harmony" rather than "by additions at the end," since this would then seem to be an example of replacing material rather than adding material.
    – Noah J
    Sep 28, 2023 at 16:22
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    Perhaps that's referring to the fact that in examples a) and b) the harmony is static (only the inversions change), so putting a new chord on beat 4 is considered an addition? Sep 28, 2023 at 16:47
  • Wow! I didn't notice that, but that seems right. Thank you. If you post your response as an answer, I will "accept" it.
    – Noah J
    Sep 28, 2023 at 16:56

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