4

I'm transcribing the first movement of Gambaro's Three Wind Quartets, and I came across this part in the Clarinet part:

Clarinet in C part

Excerpt

I'm seeing the following:

  • a dotted eighth note (.75 beats)
  • a sixteenth note (.25 beats)
  • a dotted quarter note (1.5 beats)
  • a sixteenth note (.25 beats)
  • a dotted eighth note (.75 beats)
  • a sixteenth note (.25 beats)

If you sum the beats, you get 3.75 beats. This work is in common time.

What gives?

3
  • 1
    You're right, there's a bit missing. Are the surrounding bars containing the same sort of rhythm?
    – Tim
    Commented Jun 12 at 16:41
  • 1
    There's a carbon copy of this rhythm about 6 measures down. If you want, you can find this work on IMSLP (Gambaro, Three Wind Quartets, Clarinet in C) to see the full context.
    – Ryan
    Commented Jun 12 at 16:44
  • The dots are there, they're just misaligned . Commented Jun 12 at 18:54

1 Answer 1

7

The score (with clarinet in Bb) shows that the part version has a typo. The quarter note is supposed to be double-dotted.

Excerpt from score

Link to IMSLP page: https://imslp.org/wiki/3_Wind_Quartets%2C_Op.4_(Gambaro%2C_Vincenzo)

4
  • 7
    The original actually does have two dots ... just not exactly aligned as they should be.
    – nuggethead
    Commented Jun 12 at 18:12
  • 2
    @nuggethead …and poorly subdivided! Commented Jun 12 at 18:57
  • 2
    This is why no one uses double dots!
    – nuggethead
    Commented Jun 12 at 19:36
  • 2
    I've seen a lot of older scores where the dots on dotted notes (whether single or double) are located on the beat where the dotted part begins, rather than right next to the note. This was standard notation for a while before it was changed to always be next to the note - precisely to avoid this kind of confusion. Commented Jun 13 at 21:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.