2

enter image description here

Maybe I am being overly meticulous on naming chords, but like Cadential64, can there be V with only 4-3 in classical music?

The excerpt above has the chord F Bb C and named it V/ii considering the chords in the next measure too (I guess).

But to me, it seems still out of line to name F Bb C secondary dominant, so I would name it V4-3/ii, if I encountered it in the real life.

So, is it viable to just name it V4-3/ii?

and also, in m.94, Eb is ignored when it is a chord tone for dominant seventh. Is it conventional to ignore Eb altogether?

1
  • 1
    If by "ignored" you mean "omitted", using sevenths in dominant chords is not required, even if common. Commented Jun 14 at 1:08

2 Answers 2

1

Yes. The two measures taken together are the secondary dominant of B flat with a 4-3 suspension.

There is no E♭ in m. 94; the high notes are labeled incorrectly; they are Fs.

0

Yes, but for clarity...

4-3 isn't a chord type, but a suspension type. I first thought you were asking about V43/ii, a second inversion dominant seventh chord.

While Roman numeral analysis usually goes below a staff or system (or staves), suspension figures like 4-3 go above the staff/system.

I don't mean to be pedantic, but it does make things much easier to understand when other people read your analysis.

and also, in m.94, Eb is ignored when it is a chord tone for dominant seventh. Is it conventional to ignore Eb altogether?

There is not Eb in m. 94, but if there were, you would normally not ignore it, you would label it V7/II.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.