4

From here:

  1. In 1st measure - first chord - it's said that it is C#min (i) but there are C-C#-G. I thought it should be C#-E-G# why is it C#min (i) if there are C-C#-G??

  2. In 3st measure - first chord - it's said that it is A (VI) but there are A-A-A. I thought it should be A-C#-E why is it A (VI) if there are A-A-A??

  3. In some measures (i.e. 4,12,13,25,48 etc.) there are 3 or 4 chords in one measure. I thought, in general, chords could change only on strong beats(except for syncopation). Does that mean there's a syncopation in there or what?

4

I see a problem right away in the way you are looking at the analysis. When you analyze something and notate either a chord or a Roman numeral the chord is meant to analyze all notes and pitches up to the next chord/Roman numeral change with the exception of a few non-harmonic tones that are typically notated. Also note you are in the key of C# minor so the notes F,C,G, and D are sharp unless otherwise noted.

  1. The notes in the first measure are two C# notes in the lower staff and G#, C#, and E in the top staff. This does in fact make a C#m chord.
  2. The notes in the first half of measure 3 are two A notes in the lower staff and A, C#, and E in the top staff. This does in fact make a A major chord.
  3. It is typical to speed up the harmonic rhythm as you approach cadences. At every place you mention there being more chords I see a cadence so this is a very typical and expected pattern. I wouldn't call any part of this syncopation because even though the chords are changing at a faster rate, they are still changing on predictable on the beat fashion even though it is sometimes the weak beat. In syncopation, there would be chord changes that are off-beat which is different.
  • "with the exception of a few non-harmonic tones that are typically notated." How are they notated?? – DrStrangeLove Nov 28 '14 at 5:07
  • @DrStrangeLove If there are any non harmonic tones they will typically be circled. EX: solomonsmusic.net/Nonharm.htm – Dom Nov 28 '14 at 5:38

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