1

I am an intermediate level piano player. I am able to figure out the chords for all the songs I am interested to play, but it always sounds plain to me. I usually play the chords like a rhythm or like an arpeggio, or sometimes like a broken chord, but I see many people on YouTube doing covers and their piano is a complete accompaniment for the song. When I record songs, the piano seems lacking and I believe that's mostly due to me simply playing the chords in whichever way.

So my question is, are there any resources on how to improve how you can accompany singing? How can I make my piano sound like a complete accompaniment to the song? I am able to read sheet music and play a whole song but I would really like to learn how to arrive at a "melody" for the accompaniment that is not simply playing along with the song.

0

You should consider this free online class. That seems to be perfectly suited for you. And it just started.

0

If you don't already, then figuring out the single-line [vocal] melody for the song as well as the chords would probably be useful, e.g. how you'd play the song with one finger only.

But maybe that's too basic an answer and you do this already?

  • Thanks! Yes, I do this, but since I sing the same melody, the right hand doesn't add much to the song. If you listen to songs where the piano is the sole accompaniment, there is a melody component separate from the vocals and the chords typically form the rhythm component. I wanted to learn the melody component. – Imelza Jan 15 '15 at 5:41
  • I see. I suppose my advice would still stand - see if you can identify a 1-finger melody based on what the piano is doing, if it has a strong melody in the piece. If you combine that with the vocal melody and the chords you should have something? – Mr. Boy Jan 15 '15 at 8:49
0

As an intermediate pianist you have access to the vast literature of accompanied songs. Stuff with a real piano part, not just the utility arrangements put out for popular songs. Schubert is an obvious example. Study and learn!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.