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I'm trying to learn playing recorder using plastic Yamaha YRS-302B - and there is a somewhat annoying thing: lowest notes C and D are somewhat unstable - they sound properly only when I blow very softly. Just a bit more air - and they yield shrilling pitch about octave higher. So I could not play them as loud as others.

So I wanted to ask whether there exist some description of know-how to play this two lowest notes properly - I suppose there could be something wrong with how I breath or like this.

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The lowest notes will be the most sensitive to any air leaks in the instrument. Aside from possible damage to the joints between the three parts of the instrument, the most likely cause of leaks is not covering the finger holes fully. The lowest two holes are actually two small holes, so make sure you are covering both of them completely.

The easiest way to check if the instrument has any other problems is find an experienced player and let them try it.

You are right that you need to learn to blow gently but steadily. Controlling your breath is the key to playing in tune across the whole range of the instrument.

  • Thanks for your explanations! I do not think there are any damages at joints - and yes, I'm aware of double holes - so I'll try to put more attention / experimentation to placing fingers! BTW, do I understand correctly that such behavior exists in any recorder, not only this brand / class? – Rodion Gorkovenko Mar 31 '15 at 7:50
  • Yes, most common recorders will have weaker/softer lower notes. Exceptions are the most recent generation of keyed recorders by makers like Mollenhauer, Elhert, and Breukink, and recorders with more conical or cylindrical bores found during the Renaissance and earlier. Those recorders suffer at the high end but have strong bottom notes. – ohmi Mar 31 '15 at 14:40

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