3

A year ago I finished music college as a piano player. I thought what to do next and decided to learn electric guitar. For some reasons I decided not to take teacher and learn by materials/videos available online. I found a lot of different courses/youtube channels/lessons etc. with really good teaching style BUT the main problem of all of them is explanation for absolute beginners.

I know music theory, I know how to build any chord in any key, I have developed ears, etc. and it is terrible for me to listen about how to make a chord for long 8 minutes or learn to play song note-by-note.

So the question: which path of learning should I choose to avoid as much general music theory and beginner's explanation as possible and gain only the knowledge related to guitar?

UPD: it seems like Are there any resources to self-learn the bass guitar for those who already know theory? is related to my question, however it doesn't answer it since I'm looking for something systematic (books, resources, etc) but not for general recommendation.

2

You may know the basic theory behind scales, chords, and keys and how to apply them to the piano, but you still need to learn how to apply them to the guitar.

You understand the basic concepts and that's great, but you still shouldn't skip around in any lesson because you'll need to know how it ties into your instrument. For example, you know how to build chords, but do you know all the different chord shapes for the guitar? You may know what the notes of scales are, but do you know the patterns for each scale as it relates to the guitar?

You really can't and shouldn't try to escape the theory. One way to accelerate this process is find a guitar book you like, I personally liked the Troy Stetina series although it may not be what you want since it's geared towards rock and metal, and scim the more indepth theory parts and focus more on how it relates to the guitar. The only real way around this is to get a teacher who will be able to gauge what you know and what you don't and be able to pace you appropriately.

  • Probably I was a bit unclear, my question wasn't about to learn, or to don't learn theory. I meant exactly what are you talking about - how to learn and apply music theory to guitar. However, there is a huge difference between "hello today we're gonna place your pointer finger on 4 fret on 4 string" and "here is a system of all scales/chords/arpeggios/etc which you could remember by this and this". I want to skip all newbie lessons and get only professional guitar theory in clear form (without slow and smiley teachers on videos). BTW thanks for link, rock and metal is what i want to play – Fyodor Volchyok Jul 19 '15 at 14:03
  • @FyodorVolchyok I meant what I posted. If you are learning on your own, you shouldn't skip the basic lessons as while there is a bunch of things you already know, you most likely have never been introduced to them on guitar. A teacher will be able to circumvent this as with getting a book where you can skim the general knowledge. – Dom Jul 19 '15 at 14:06
  • @FyodorVolchyok - Dom is right. The piano is graphically set out, go right to higher notes, left to lower. However, on guitar, there are numerous places where the SAME NOTE can be played. Off the top of my head, there are at least 10 places where you can sound the same note as top string open! So, learn about the guitar from scratch. Theory is only part. – Tim Jul 19 '15 at 17:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.