6

Does first and second bar mean the same thing? If no, is there a simplified notation for the first one?

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  • 1
    You should specify the instrument(s) in question. In this case it may not matter, but for some markings it does Jul 30, 2015 at 14:41
  • Actually the first is the most simplified notation already (and as such may not be known to inexperienced nor not formally trained players), full notation would have beams with each 32th note listed.
    – guidot
    Aug 21, 2015 at 9:32

2 Answers 2

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These two bars don't denote the same thing. The first asks the player to alternate the two notes. The second asks the player to repeat the two-note chords.

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  • Beat me to it! Nice to see some answer from you again!
    – Tim
    Jul 29, 2015 at 18:18
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There are two different types of tremolo indicated in your example.

The first bar, where the tremolo lines are placed between notes, requires the rapid reiterations (here, in 32'nd notes) of the alternating notes indicated. The first tremolo requires that we alternate between middle C and its octave (higher) in 32'nd notes for half a measure. The second tremolo requires that we alternate similarly between E's.

The second bar, where the tremolo lines are written through the stems of the notes, require that we play the notes rapidly in unison. So, with the first tremolo in the 2nd measure, we play the middle C and its octave in unison, in 32nd notes for half a measure. And similarly for the second tremolo on E.

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