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I've been doing this:

http://tonedear.com/ear-training/absolute-perfect-pitch-test

For some basic pitch testing. I set it to be as easy as possible, just two notes, C and D.

I get almost every question wrong, and I'm 50 iterations in.

Should I give up? Can I just not do it, is it a genetic limitation? Is there a way to change it and improve?

I really just don't know what I'm supposed to be hearing. They sound more or less the same to me, I can't pick out any identifying characteristic that yells "This is a C!" or "This is a D!"

marked as duplicate by Matthew Read Aug 26 '15 at 0:34

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  • In general with ear training, it's really hard to explain what something sounds like and if you don't hear it, it really can't be explained to you. I remember in one of my ear training classes in college, a student was having a hard time distinguishing between a major chord and a minor chord and the student asked what a major chord sounds like and the teacher responded with "It sounds like a major chord" which is kind of the only thing anyone can say. It's the same with perfect pitch and any specific note. – Dom Aug 25 '15 at 22:08
  • My sense of pitch improved when I was tuning my guitar and playing everyday. Eventually I had to buy more precise tuners and do more careful intonation adjustments or I would find my guitars annoying. Singing also made a big difference. So those are things that will help ok the side, so to speak. – Todd Wilcox Aug 25 '15 at 23:25
  • This isn't quite an exact duplicate of the question I linked, but it's quite broad and generic. Please take a look at that and at the other related questions in the sidebar, and feel free to ask a more specific question if they don't address all of your concerns. – Matthew Read Aug 26 '15 at 0:35

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