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In a major scale, I know the chords to be: major, minor, minor, major, major, minor and diminished.

What are the chords for the chromatic scale...using the C-major scale as reference...?!

What I mean is, in the C-major scale as example we have C-major, D-minor, E-minor, F-major, G-major, A-minor and B-diminished, in that order using only the triads. What about the other notes like the C#, D#, etc...that makes up the chromatic scale...are they major, minor or diminished chords...?!

closed as unclear what you're asking by Dom Jan 12 '16 at 13:17

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    This doesn't make much sense. Obviously, you can construct any possible chord from the chromatic scale. What do you mean by "using the C-major scale as reference"? – Matt L. Dec 5 '15 at 12:15
  • What I mean is, in the C-major scale as example we have C-major, D-minor, E-minor, F-major, G-major, A-minor and B-diminished, in that order using only the triads. What about the other notes like the C#, D#, etc...that makes up the chromatic scale...are they major, minor or diminished chords...?! – Raphael Gbologah Dec 5 '15 at 12:22
  • They can be anything if all notes of the chromatic scale are allowed. – Matt L. Dec 5 '15 at 12:37
  • Generally the chromatic scale is used as an ornament, and you would not give a different chord to each note in the chromatic scale. – aparente001 Dec 6 '15 at 2:38
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The chords could be anything. In the C chromatic scale, for the I chord we can have:

C major: C,E,G
C minor: C,Eb,G
C augmented: C,E,G#
C half diminished: C,Eb,Gb,Bb
C diminished: C,Eb,Gb,A

All of the above can be used in the chromatic scale, because all of the above notes belong in the chromatic scale.

The same goes for the 11 other notes in the scale.

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Everything and nothing. Since every one of the 12 edo notes feature in the chromatic scale, any conceivable chord will fit, although it sounds better if the note/s played over that chord are actually contained within that chord.

Having said that, melodies, in the Western world at least, tend to be made from the diatonic notes of a scale, which makes them sound more coherent. Tunes made up of notes played chromatically do work, but there is usually a framework of diatonic notes holding them together. The same goes for the chords themselves. Yes, there are pieces that seem randomly put together, with the chords not related to each other, but most pieces will have structure that is not easy to make or understand just using chromatic notes. Maybe because there would appear to be no datum point, as in what we know as a key.

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For example we use for C major scale C-major, D-minor, E-minor, F-major, G-major, A-minor, B-diminished. When we play chromatic scale we can use "susspended4" chourd immdetly after the major chourds.I mean after C-major, F-major and G-major and for those chourds wich comes immdetly after mainor chourds I mean D-minor, E-minor&A-minor we can use "susspended2"

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For me the only way to make sense of your question is to interpret it as "which chords outside the key are frequently added to a piece in major?". Because otherwise the obvious answer is that if you allow any note, any chord could be added.

In a major key, it is quite common to add chords from the parallel minor key. The concept of using chords from a parallel tonality is called modal interchange. The parallel minor key will give you chords with roots on all chromatic notes except for the b2 (the Db in the key of C) and the #4/b5 (F#/Gb). A chord with the b2 as a root can be borrowed from phrygian. If you combine the chords from the parallel (natural) minor scale and from phrygian, you get these additional triads in the key of C:

Db major | Eb major | Ab major | Bb major

Apart from these chords with root notes which are not part of the C major scale, you can also use chords with roots from the scale, but with other chord tones outside the scale. These other chord tones can also be borrowed from the parallel minor key, and the most frequently used chords are (again in C):

D diminished | F minor | G minor

Yet another source of chords from outside the major scale are secondary dominants (and their related II chords), resolving to diatonic chords:

A7 => Dm | [F#m7(b5) B7] => Em | [Gm7 C7] => F | D7 => G | E7 => Am

where the arrow => means 'resolves to'.

See also this answer to a related question.

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    I don't think which chords outside the key are frequently added to a piece in major? is what OP is asking here. I think what he asks is pretty much answered by your Because otherwise the obvious answer is that if you allow any note, any chord could be added. – Shevliaskovic Dec 5 '15 at 16:51
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    @Shevliaskovic: That could be, but if you're right, then the question is absolutely pointless and should be closed. – Matt L. Dec 5 '15 at 17:10

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