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I've managed to secure an unofficial position as my church's chief handchime ringer (predictably, I have no experience in ringing chimes or bells). While I have managed to figure out single chime technique, I'm finding myself somewhat at a loss regarding four-in-hand technique. I can't seem to find a sane way of holding two chimes orthogonally in a single hand in a way that would allow me to use the 'ring and knock' technique. Are there any generally accepted methods for using multiple chimes in hand?

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While four-in-hand is more difficult for the handchimes than handbells, it is possible to hold and ring effectively with multiple chimes in each hand. The most frequent problem occurs when the ringer attempts to dampen one chime and ring the other in quick succession. While the position in hand differs, the ringing technique remains the same as any four-in-hand with handbells. The position used in my church bell choir places the lower chime between the thumb and index finger with the top facing towards the thumb. The second chime is placed between the index and middle finger facing back at the ringer. Here is an example of four-in-hand with a C6 chime and an E6 chime:

C6 and E6 four-in-hand

I hope this answer is clear, concise, and helpful.

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