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If my vocal range is (A2-)F3-B5(-C7), what is my voice type? I tried looking on google but it doesn't specify exactly my voice type, it just shows common voice types.

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When it comes to vocal ranges there are actually 2 types of ranges: the overall range and the actual usable range. Many vocalists can hit very deep or very high ranges or notes but cannot actually sustain any practical or prolonged usage in these areas.

Referring to the 0-8 octave range of measurement, you seem to have a very wide range which would cover from the deep bass range all the way up to the coloratura soprano, a 5+ octave range? Normally, most singers are the most comfortable or can sing in a practical manner in the middle of such a wide range, for example with such an extension, this would fall in between the baritone to the tenor including part of the alto range.

In this case, the usable range would be considered to be a tenor unless a person can sing continuously beyond this range without it sounding strained or unnatural. There are a lot of singers that sing primarily in the baritone range but can also temporarily hit notes as high as C6-C7 through use of the head voice/falsetto.

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I don't think it's possible to have a range that big. What you specified is like 5 octaves, and most people only have around 1 to 1 1/2.A2 is 2 lines below the bottom of the treble staff, and C7 is 5 lines and a space above the top of the treble staff! That's humongous. You might be able to reach some really high notes if you strain your vocal cords to the max, but you won't be able to sing there, and it definitely won't sound good. Same thing for low notes. Just because you can reach those notes,(which sounds a bit unlikely to me) doesn't mean they're in your range.

But if you really have that range, you can sing just about everything in the women's spectrum, so contralto, alto, mezzo-soprano, or soprano, whatever you like most. Most of your range is more on the higher side. If I were you, though, I'd check with a piano keyboard to see whether you can actually comfortably sing all the way up. Play Middle C and match your voice to that note. Hold it for four counts. If you can comfortably do it, go up a step until you can no longer COMFORTABLY sing the note. Then go back and go down from Middle C. You don't have to use Middle C, but it's the easiest to find on the piano keyboard, so I usually use it.

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That vocal range seems too large. 5 octaves. There's a great website, Google: "Singers Hub" and post your question on there.

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