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So I came across this video and decided to learn this arrangement to improve my technique (of course not as fast as in the video). I'm not too sure what the best fingering is (for the left hand) despite the video, simply because I can't deduce how exactly he's playing it.

Now, the first part is arpeggios with both hands:

First part arpeggio's

The right hand fingering, if I'm correct, is:

  • ascending: 2 3 4 1 per quarter note (so thumb on G)
  • descending: 2 1 4 3 per quarter note (so thumb on G still)

The left hand fingering is unclear, does anyone have a suggestion? My own idea was:

  • ascending: 4 2 1 3 per quarter note (???)
  • descending: 2 3 4 1 per quarter note (so thumb on G)

Also, for the second part: is the left hand always playing with a fingering of 5/2 (even for the first sixteenth, which is an octave) alternated with 4/1? Second part arpeggio

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I would use:

First passage, right hand, going up: 2341 2341 etc.
First passage, right hand, going down: 2143 2143 etc.
First passage, left hand, going up: 5213 5213 etc.
First passage, left hand, going down: 2312 3412 3412 etc.
Second passage, going up: 15/25/13/24 13/25/13/24 13/25/13/24 etc.
Second passage, going down: same in reverse.

(In contrast to Brian Chandler's answer, I have the upper note first in my notation for the second passage.)

The second passage is obviously more difficult than the first, and cases can be made for a variety of fingerings. (I think the performer uses Brian's fingering.) While it may seem a bit counterintuitive to take the larger intervals with closer together fingers (13 on the EC sixth instead of 14 as Brian has it), it is easier (for me) to jump to 24 on the FB fourth from 13 on the EC third than it is to jump to 25, as would be necessary if I were to take the EC sixth with 14.

To a large extent the fingering you use depends on the size and configuration of your hand. Take into account not just whether you can comfortably take an interval with a particular fingering, but whether you can easily go to the next note with that fingering as well. For example, I have to stretch to hit an octave with 25, so I'm limited as to where I can go next if I do it. As such, the fingering for the second passage that you ask about is awkward to me (for other reasons as well). I wouldn't use it.

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The key to playing passages like this fast is to unlearn the "thumb under" technique that you probably started out with. Pay a group of notes, "flip your wrist" to get you hand in position for the next group, repeat till done.

For the first passage, I would play each beat as a group:

RH 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 .... 4/5 3 2 1 4/5 3 2 1 (4 or 5 depending how big your hands are)

LH 5 3 2 1 5 3 2 1 .... 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 (yes, that really does mean two consecutive notes with the thumb at the top - move your hand between the beats)

For the second passage, the first octave is on its own, and then take pairs of chords

5-2 3-1

5-2 3/4-1 etc and similarly back down.

But first, watch this:

Note:, I wrote this before looking at the OP's video - and on the basis that "fast" meant about "fast as in the links below". But the same technique works just as well at Allegretto as at Presto.

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No-one can say which is the best fingering for you, but here's what I would do.

First part arpeggios (no apostrophe!) RH up: 1 2 3 4 : thumb on the 1st note of the beat helps with emphasis; any break as your hand moves comes in a good place. (Your fingering looks very awkward)

RH down: 5/1 4 3 2 - just the reverse of up

LH up: 5 2 1 4 5 2 1 4... last one 1 2 1 2 LH down: 1 2 3 4

Also, for the second part: is the left hand always playing with a fingering of 5/2 (even for the first sixteenth, which is an octave) alternated with 4/1?

I would do 51 52 31 52 41 52 31 ... but this is really quite hard, and you have to find the smoothest way that fits your fingers.

  • Can you clarify "LH up"? Why would you start with the thumb on the lowest note? Also, have you checked the video - not saying that's the only solution, but that RH 2341 doesn't seem very awkward. Apostrophe removed, that's the spelling in my native language. – FDM Feb 21 '16 at 13:47
  • Sorry: that was a mistake - start with 5, obviously. I didn't read the question very carefully, and did not realise that I was supposed to be reconstructing someone else's fingering. The one cited is perhaps not too awkward, as you say, but it means four thumb-unders, whereas mine has only three. And I think shaping each group of four into a single hand movement makes it easier to aim for a smooth result. But in the end, as I said at the beginning, everyone has to find the fingering that is best for themselves. – Brian Chandler Feb 21 '16 at 19:29

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