1

For my entire learning career as a violinist (25 years) I've been given arpeggios to practice with similar characteristics, always in a specific order.

1) there's the regular major (1 3 5 8 5 3 1).

2) Then there's 1 3 6 8 6 3 1.

3) Then 1 4 6 8 6 4 1.

4) Then diminished (1 min3 dim5 dim7 8 dim7 dim5 min3 1)

5) and then dominant (1 3 5 7 8 7 5 3 new1).

Does anyone know what the second and third arpeggios are named? And / or why string players (and maybe other instrumentalists) ended up practicing them in this order?

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#2 is a minor triad in first inversion (it has the 3rd as the lowest note). #3 is a major triad in second inversion (the 5th is lowest).

Doing them in this order forms a simple chord progression: I vi IV vii°/V V.

  • Oh cool! So 2) is f# minor first inversion, and then 3) is d major in first inversion not second, right? – Jenni Yael Apr 26 '16 at 15:57
  • @JenniYael - it depends what key you're in! Sounds like you're in A maj. – Tim Apr 26 '16 at 17:30
  • Lol! Yes I used A major as an example for myself – Jenni Yael Apr 27 '16 at 23:03

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