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Is it recommended to play g chords on a guitar with middle finger and index finger reversed? I find it easier to use the middle finger where the index should be, since it is longer or is this a bad habit that I will have to unlearn later on?

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    Having spent 5 minutes trying to swap my middle and index fingers I have to admit I can't do it for an open G chord. Can you pop up a picture to show us what you mean. – Doktor Mayhem Jul 26 '16 at 7:55
  • I also have tried with index on E3 and middle on A2, and admit defeat. Using middle and ring works o.k. A picture paints a thousand words. – Tim Jul 26 '16 at 9:10
  • What chord window is telling you what you should play, please? – Tim Jul 26 '16 at 9:17
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Since it's you and your fingers playing that guitar, then the choice must be yours. Recommendations are often made for which fingering, but it is down to personal choice. What works best for you, in other words. I'm assuming it's the open version, E3 A2 D0 G0 B0 e3. Other options include pressing a B3 instead of B0, and another consideration is where you were on the previous chord, and, indeed, where you're going next. There may, and probably should be, a couple of options for fingering some chords, with this in mind. Also, G7 often follows G, so with a couple of options - E3 A2 D3 G0 B0 e3, or E3 A2 D0 G0 B0 e1, you need to consider movement of fingers from one to another, which in turn dictates what fingers you use.

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There are several ways to play an open G chord on guitar (click here to see 5 different options for open G 5 Ways to play an Open G Chord

It is anatomically impossible for a standard human to be able to reverse the index and middle finger on the E and A strings of a guitar while playing an open G. But you can play the same chord using an alternate fingering as shown below (you just can't cross the middle finger over the index finger on the two bass strings as suggested in your question).

What you may have seen is two diagrams showing alternate ways to play the open G.

The most common version is shown below. In all the diagrams 1 = index finger and 2 = middle finger 3 = ring finger and 4 = pinkie.

enter image description here

This version uses the index finger on the A string and middle finger on the E string. No matter how hard you try - YOU CAN NOT reverse those fingers!

However you CAN play an alternate fingering of the same voicing of that open G chord that does in fact use your middle finger on the A string with your ring finger on the E string. But you can't reverse the middle and ring finger. See picture below.

enter image description here

Another popular option for the open G offers a slightly different voicing and can most easily be played with the fingering shown below.

enter image description here

You can't swap your index finger and middle finger but you could swap your pinkie and ring finger if it was more comfortable.

This voicing uses the index finger and middle finger in the same place as the first fingering (first picture) but uses the ring finger on the b string.

As Tim suggests, there are different fingerings for many chords and the one you choose will depend on what is easiest for you to play. Learning different fingerings for certain chords will give you the option to choose the fingering that best facilitates the following chord change. Different "voicings" (in contrast to different fingerings of the same voicing) allow you to choose the one that sounds best in a particular song.

I have some strong feelings about how you should learn to finger the open G chord in particular. You can read about them here Best Way to Play an Open G Chord

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