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I am 30 years old and I recently bought a keyboard. I had not played the piano before, but I took 4 years of accordion when I was a child. I remember some theoretical concept, but I consider myself a beginner.

I am really frustrated because I never bothered learning a rock instrument decently when I really had the opportunity. During college I had a lot of time, but I lacked the perseverance and even if I taught myself some chords on the guitar, I never made any real progress... besides that, I really feel guitar is not my thing, y feel more "myself" playing keyboard. The thing is one of the dreams of my life is to be able to play an instrument good enough to play in a band. Even if I just perform once in a small bar in exchange for a sandwich and a beer, I need to do this before I die.

I listen to a lots of different styles: hard rock, heavy metal, punk, rap, proggresive rock, ska, synthpop, classical rock, indie pop... I can enjoy almost any style in popular music, and right now I don't have an actual preference about what style to play.

My question is the following: what is the music style that would take me less to be able to play decently enough to be on an amateur band? What are the steps I should take to learn how to play it, and what is the theoretical background I need to write songs in that style?

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The one that you love. Some styles are more technically difficult than others, but the key is the motivation. If you love playing, you'll keep at it.

Pop and Rock keyboard can be pretty straightforward, depending on the songs, of course. Some of the modern synth heavy music can be tricky to play live because there are so many layers.

If I were you, I'd look around your area and see what bands are about. Generally, there are many more guitarists than keyboard players, so it may be a little easier to find a band. If you can read some chords, and are easy to get along with, you should be able to find something. Sure, you'll probably suck. I did. Sometimes I still do. But I suck less than I did five years ago, and that's what I focus on.

So, in summary, pick something you love playing, then get out there and give it a go! That's what I did. I started playing sax a few years back, and a couple of weeks ago I played in a pageant in front of 300,000 people (not by myself; in a marching band). I certainly didn't think that would happen when I squawked my way though my first practice.

  • Thanks for your advice about finding a band. The people in the city I live in is more political than average, and they have a taste for punk and ska, so that could be a good start. – user266075 Dec 10 '16 at 9:00
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I agree with the above comment. If you don't enjoy the process, you will never get to the "end." My advice is to learn to love playing just by yourself, then you will have to motivation to continue playing the rest of your life, not just until you've played one gig.

Here's some other thoughts: look for some local coffee shops are pubs that have live music and go and play there. It's usually pretty easy to find something like that, and playing on your own will help you get better. Network and make musician friend then ask them to play with you one time.

I hope you know what you're saying you are trying to do. But if you do, and you are all in, and you are a hard worker, and you love your instrument, is never too late and you can do it.

Here's how to know what chords go together. That gives you a place to start: https://wordpress.com/post/ofonechord.wordpress.com/76

Good luck.

  • Nancy, you may want to doublecheck these links; I'm unable to access the site. – Richard Dec 8 '16 at 0:31
  • Perhaps this is the link: ofonechord.wordpress.com/music-theory-explained? – endorph Dec 8 '16 at 1:18
  • Of course, I plan to keep on playing after the first gig. It would be nice to have a back up plan in case someday being a mathematician does not do it for me anymore. About those local coffee shops you talk about, that is not something you can usually find in my country. Thanks anyway! – user266075 Dec 10 '16 at 9:02

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