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I have been doing my music reading and something perplexed me. What is the enharmonic equivalent of C sharp in key of D major?

  • I'm not completely sure what you're asking here. C sharp is naturally in the key of D major. As Tims answer says, there are a few enharmonic equivalents, but there's no need to use them in the key of D. You'd just write a C, which is assumed to be a C sharp because that's denoted in the key signature. – AJFaraday Feb 27 '17 at 15:28
  • @AJFaraday - one might need all sorts of enharmonic spellings, but not, as asked here, another enharmonic spelling of an existing diatonic note, as you say. – Tim Feb 27 '17 at 15:53
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The key one's in doesn't affect the naming of enharmonic notes. The enharmonic of C# is Db in any key, although there won't be many instances of that note being named as Db whilst in the key of D.

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    The other option of B double sharp is equally unlikely in D major. Just because notes can have enharmonic equivalents doesn't mean they should! – user19146 Feb 27 '17 at 7:34
  • "The other option" might be slightly misleading; theoretically, there's an infinite number of enharmonic equivalents for any note. – 11684 Feb 27 '17 at 15:25
  • @11684 - an infinite number? I make it 3 for each, using x and bb where needed. There really is no need, technically, to go into ### or bbb territory - those enharmonic equivalents can usually be portrayed with sensible notation. – Tim Feb 27 '17 at 15:49
  • Well yes, that's why I inserted "theoretically", although there are some instances of triple flats and/or sharps. I only mentioned this because I think it would help the OP's understanding of enharmonic equivalents. – 11684 Feb 27 '17 at 15:52
  • I can't think of any common situations where you would have a Db in D major but the first that comes to mind is a minor chord built on b6 (Bb minor), which would be quite a departure. So basically yeah, there isn't much use for an enharmonic spelling of C# in D major unless you're doing some weird stuff. – Basstickler Feb 27 '17 at 16:33

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