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enter image description here

I am quite the beginner at the piano, and I only know where C,D,E,F,G,A,B is placed at the piano and on the grand staff of piano. I am using Synthesia to practice my rythm (and as a way to check that I am actually playing correctly), and I am not sure why that specific symbol is a sharp. It looks like a normal C to me.

Another example:

enter image description here

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    I just wanted to say that that music is notated very incorrectly and is going to confuse you.
    – MattPutnam
    Mar 18, 2017 at 20:43
  • @MattPutnam You are probably right. There are still a couple of symbols in there I don't know so they won't really confuse me at the moment. I just use the PC as a rhythm helper so I get it right anyway. I have only been playing for a little over 1 month. This song might be a couple of levels too high for me to play, but I love it so much I want to learn it quickly. youtube.com/watch?v=F0wieyNeCFw
    – David
    Mar 18, 2017 at 21:21
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    @David "There are still a couple of symbols in there I don't know so they won't really confuse me at the moment." Almost everything in both your pictures of the music notation is incorrect (i.e. it doesn't follow the standard conventions). Wherever that software claims to be doing, it certainly isn't teaching you how to read sheet music.
    – user19146
    Mar 18, 2017 at 23:28

1 Answer 1

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Left from 1/4 you can see two sharps, those two sharps mean that you need to press F# and C# where on the staff you have F and C.

This part is written in the key of D Major.

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  • Thank you for that. I managed to play the whole play without looking at the bottom of my PC screen now.
    – David
    Mar 18, 2017 at 20:05
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    you are welcome, don't forget to keep practicing, maybe get a tutor and some good books, it's pretty hard in the beginning but it gets easier, have fun
    – supreme_tg
    Mar 18, 2017 at 20:06
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    Just to add to @supreme-tg's answer: the two sharps for F and C at the start of the third bar - just before the 1/4 time signature - are called a "key signature." The accidentals (sharps/flats) of the key signature apply for the whole score unless a new key signature is given in a new bar. Mar 18, 2017 at 20:28

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