3

Excuse me if this has been asked before, but what is the notation called when after the timing there is:

two quavers = one crotchet, one quaver, as a triplet

An example is on this music

5

This is swung eighths; more loosely, the music has "swing". More precisely, I'd refer to it as "triplet swung eighths" or "triplet feel" if the intent is more of a 2/3,1/3 breakdown. In blues influenced music, it might be referred to as a [blues] shuffle. In classical music it is referred to as notes inégales.

Jazz purists may balk at the term "swung" (or swing) since in that idiom, the term swing conveys a rhythmic feel that is distinct from whether the initial eighth is elongated (that's why it's indicated as being loose talk).

  • @marcellothearcane see musescore.org/en/node/10570 (I happened on this while searching for the links in the answer). – Dave Apr 7 '17 at 14:43
  • Yes, I did too - just asked being lazy! It sounds good now, thanks – marcellothearcane Apr 7 '17 at 14:45
0

It is quaver triplets. Often called 'swing' time. Obviously easier to write out and read as standard quavers, the first being played twice as long as the third.

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