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Whenever I sing "e" vowel in head voice I can feel the vibrations on head by placing a hand and the "e" vowel in head voice is strong as well and also "o" vowel.
But when I place my hand on my head and sing the "a" vowel I can't feel it and airy sort of weak head voice comes out
My falsetto register is very strong and also mix voice is strong and chest as well and I can't make "a" vowel of head voice strong
and also once I start to sing in head voice after the "a" vowel all the song sounds weak in head voice
How can I make my head voice stronger , I also tried some exercises like "HAW" sound keeping the larynx low but did not help
I can't even fill a room with my head voice

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    try gradually transitioning from your stronger vowels into "ah". There is no fixed line between vowel sounds, so gradually change from one to the other, and when you feel your sound get weak then notice what you are doing to cause it to happen. literally just go eeeeeeaaaaa oooooaaaaaa if that makes sense. – Some_Guy Apr 11 '17 at 9:05
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"ah" has fewer overtones than "eh" so depending on what you exactly feel, there may be a difference not corresponding fully to a difference in audibility.

That being said: who cares about the vibrations of your head? Hold your hand in some distance before your mouth: what you feel there is more relevant.

The important thing for a resonant tone quality is mouth shape: it has to adapt with pitch and vowel: sing multivowel exercises (like the typical "la be da me ni po tu la" sequence of the Sieber exercises) and keep the resonance in your mouth and before you intact and the lines connected in character and resonance.

Of course, when actively chasing best resonance with economic adjustments, the result is not "speech on pitch" but rather singing with vowel adjustment. It's still comprehensible but when employed fully more an "aria" rather than a "recitativo" style.

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Not being able to feel your head resonating when you hold your hand on it is not an indication that your 'head voice' is weak. It's all about the sound. Your skull is neither producing nor measuring the sound.

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