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I recently bought a boxed set of Beethoven CDs. I had most of the works already but it was still a cost effective way to fill some gaps.

Beethoven - Complete Masterpieces at Amazon

One surprising item in it was a string quintet version of the Kreutzer violin sonata. I love the violin sonata so this was very interesting and I liked it immediately.

However, information on it seems to be sparse. It appears that the arrangement is not by Beethoven.

What is known about this piece?

  • This is off-topic and should be moved to music fans. – guidot Apr 13 '17 at 10:10
  • I have just found and joined Music Fans. How do I move the question? Just delete here and repost there or is there a better way? – badjohn Apr 13 '17 at 10:16
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This document has some information about it

mro.massey.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10179/4736/02_whole.pdf?sequence=1

Edit added by cellocgw

Qoting from p.42 of said document, (apologies for the pasteup but the jackass who published this copy-locked it) enter image description here

  • Thanks. That is much more substantial than anything that I have found so far. – badjohn Apr 13 '17 at 10:18
  • Great document(even if not overly difficult to google). Answers consisting mostly of a link typically find no enthusiastic reception here, however. – guidot Apr 13 '17 at 10:33
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Probably off-topic here, nevertheless:

According to this German sheet music publisher the transcription was made by an anonymous contemporary composer.

According to that publisher it was first published 1832.

While the violin part was kept practically unchanged for the first violin, the piano part was skillfully broken apart and freely adapted, with a "touch of Boccherini-like mediterranean style". The quintet is for 2 violins, viola and 2 violoncelli (as Schuberts, but also widely employed by Boccherini).

  • Thanks. I have just found and joined Music Fans. I played it before discovering that the arrangement was not by Beethoven himself and I was quite surprised when I discovered it. – badjohn Apr 13 '17 at 10:15

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