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I've been singing for 30 years without incident (except for flus and colds) and my voice has always worked. I moved to Florida a few months ago and noticed a steady decline in my vocal ability to the point that I have a seriously compressed range and cannot control pitch.

I assumed allergies so I started OTC antihistamines. When those didn't work, I went to an allergist who had nothing to offer. My ENT said my vocal cords are in healthy condition and he sees no throat issues. He suggested a vocal coach, but this feels physiological, not mechanical.

For a while I had an itchy throat that I could only "scratch" by coughing vigorously. I do have some post-nasal drip. I try to stay well hydrated but my throat always feels dry and tight.

I am looking for ideas and suggestions. I'm about to turn 60. What else can I explore? Is this age-related? Environmental changes? (I was living in Atlanta for two years. I'm originally from NY.) Do throat sprays or teas really work?

I miss singing. Its my "drug" but I am also a professional singer with a gig coming up.

  • Yes, it's most probably because of your age. For example Jon Anderson (prog-rock band "Yes") refused to sing because his voice was gone. He was about 70 at that time. – Eugen Eray May 9 '17 at 16:55
  • You should continue to work with medical professionals; I don't think we can help you. But I would also suggest looking into vocal dystonia. Warm uncaffeinated tea and staying hydrated are certainly helpful for the voice. – Matthew Read May 9 '17 at 21:12
  • Don't give up. Set backs happen. I've been out from playing my main instrument from an injury for 4 months now. I've picked up another instrument to keep me occupied :) – Kolob Canyon May 10 '17 at 5:15
  • Have you tried a neurologist? I might wonder if something has affected your RLN. Whatever it is, sorry that it has happened to you, and good luck! – Ben I. May 16 '17 at 2:53
  • Could be due to heartburn - acid reflux, which can be triggered by hiatus hernia or overall waistline. – noumenal Jun 22 '17 at 14:21
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My educated guess would be that it is environmental. Some people react extremely badly to water damaged buildings, and I'd guess that you're living or working in one (this is from personal experience.) Also could be that you are just allergic to whatever is in the air in Seattle and you weren't in your previous location. I'm 68 and can still sing....and I have to stay out of water damaged buildings. It depends a lot on what air I have been breathing. There is a boatload of info out there about disorders having to do with water damaged buildings, and it would be up to you to do your research, since any doctor you find would be unlikely to be cognizant of these types of health problems. The exception in the Seattle area would be the Sophia clinic. A web site that may be of use is survivingmold dot com. Best of luck.

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