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One of the people who were answering my question about multi-voicings showed a piano piece and showed the fact that two voices were used in the measure. The top melody (stems up) started with a quarter note rest and a variety of eighth notes to create 4/4 time. The lower voice (stems down) started on an eighth note rest and the next note was a dotted quarter and two more quarter notes. So once again we have 4/4 time. The person showing the example could have gone one step further and gone back to the original measure and shown how one does the counting with the two voices. Since the top part works out to be 4/4 time starting with the quarter rest, how do I count lone quarter do note D (stem down) in the lower part of the measure. The only way I can see for counting is the dotted quarter would have to be counted as (and) or (and a) because it couldn't be counted as a dotted quarter or there would be no way to fit into the 4/4 time signature. When I asked the various teachers at the music shops around town, this seemed to be the general consensus. I hope that you don't think that I am asking the same question for a third time. If so I am sorry and blame my fevered brain! Thanks! Garu

closed as unclear what you're asking by Doktor Mayhem Jun 8 '17 at 22:44

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Could you link directly to the image, and clean up your text a little bit? This is almost impossible to make heads or tails of. – Ben I. Jun 5 '17 at 1:11
  • A voicing is a way of playing a chord. Multiple voices in a score represent separate simultaneous melodies or parts. I think you might want to edit your question to replace "voicings" with "voices" to make it more clear. – Todd Wilcox Jun 5 '17 at 1:16
  • Please add images so we can see what you are actually asking. – Doktor Mayhem Jun 8 '17 at 22:45
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If I've guessed correctly what you mean by your "wall of text" description, the point is that you count up the beats in each of the two voices independently.

It might be easier to understand using different colors for the voices, rather than everything in black and white. The counting goes like this:

enter image description here

The top melody (stems up) started with a quarter note rest and a variety of eighth notes to create 4/4 time. The lower voice (stems down) started on an eighth note rest and the next note was a dotted quarter and two more quarter notes.

Of course the notes in this example don't match your description, but with luck the rhythm is the same.

  • Thank you very much Alephzero for showing me the proper way to do the counting for multiple voices in a measure. I've tried for several days to explain the problem without a picture "wall of text" but your example clarifies the issue for me and now I can approach the measures with more understanding. – user40740 Jun 6 '17 at 4:20

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