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I need to put a rhythm in one of my songs but I can't for the life of me figure out how to put it on music. Here is me tapping the rhythm, if you could please add some notation for this rhythm that would be great (I don't know if there is a better way to add audio snippets in SE so I just uploaded it to Google Drive): https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwdYyT-EJPqCaDBPRTgxM0E2U0k/view

closed as off-topic by Dom Aug 10 '17 at 17:05

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions about transcribing or finding a particular song, including identifying chords, notes, key and time signatures, or similar elements, are off-topic since they are rarely useful to future readers." – Dom
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3

Here's that rhythm, as a single bar of 4/4:

Rhythm

I assumed your first beat was a quarter. If not, adjust accordingly.

2

Fugu is correct. But - 'give a man a fish...' as the saying goes: by dividing any problematic bar into more, smaller pieces, it's easier to notate it. Here, it's best to split into semiquavers (sixteenths), and count it out slowly. That way, each and every dot will be allocated a number of counts, like the first crotchet(quarter) has 1-2-3-4 on it.

Don't bother counting up to 16, it makes it make more sense to count 1 2 3 4, 2 2 3 4, 3 2 3 4, 4 2 3 4. So using this, you'll be able to try the next by yourself! In 4/4 it's easier to read when each bar can be seen to split clearly into two halves.That's why Fugu has tied the 3rd and 4th notes.

  • Yeah, I mean, this is basically what I did. Tap it slow enough that you can count all of the subdivisions and then write it down. I would also highly recommend breaking things up so that you can concentrate on the subunits, instead of trying to do, say, a whole bar in one go. – Fugu Aug 10 '17 at 11:13
  • If you replace the final quarter note with 4 sixteenths, this is very close to a reasonably common blues bass line. Imagine a repeated tonic for all notes, and then the final beat goes tonic, down to 5,6,7, resolve to tonic on next measure's downbeat. – Carl Witthoft Aug 10 '17 at 11:29

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