1

What are the ways to involve an audience during a solo performance? And what do you do if you feel they are not interested in listening?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Tim, Matthew Read Aug 13 '17 at 19:03

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    Would this be solo drums, vocal, piano, etc. There are some important details that need adding into your question. What sort of audience - seated, dancing, 20 people, 1000 people? What sort of venue? Karaoke, pub, stadium, someone's lounge? All salient points missing! Maybe your profile is a clue, maybe not... – Tim Aug 11 '17 at 7:19
  • 2
    If they're not interested, then either (1) they didn't know what kind of music was on the program, (2) your performance is weak, (3) it's just one of those days. Ask any standup comic: sometimes you bomb; get used to it and prepare for a better night next time. – Carl Witthoft Aug 11 '17 at 11:34
  • Sorry, but without extra information, I will vote to close this question as it cannot be understood what is being asked. – Tim Aug 11 '17 at 18:55
4
  • Talk to them.

  • Tell some jokes.

  • Give them some anecdotes referring to the song sung.

  • Choose an audience member, and talk diectly to them.

  • Be self- deprecating.

  • Make eye contact with some members of the audience.

  • Do not stick to a set list - choose various different styles/songs to suit what you think they may appreciate.

  • Try segueing several songs.

  • Stop playing at some point, and ask them what they would like - you may not get constructive answers, but at least you'll know!

  • If all else fails, find a different venue, with a different audience. It might just be the square peg in the round hole.

  • Be self-deprecating... you must be English! JK, I do that plenty as well. It certainly works for comedians, so it could easily work for a musician as well, however, I wouldn't overemphasize this aspect of things. – Basstickler Aug 11 '17 at 17:56
  • @Basstickler - English through and through! You wouldn't overemphasise it - I didn't . It was 10% of my answer... If one can't take the rise out of oneself, then it's hardly fair to take it out of anyone else, and if one doesn't do it to oneself, someone else is going to do it for one... – Tim Aug 11 '17 at 18:53
  • Right, I certainly didn't think you were suggesting it should be the centerpiece of their performance banter, just thought I'd throw it out there. My joke on being English and self-deprecation basically comes from John Oliver jokes. – Basstickler Aug 11 '17 at 20:08
0

Perform well, to an audience interested in your type of music. Or, sometimes, accept that you're just background, they quite like the noise you're making but also want to drink, talk etc. Just carry on, and don't try to force attention by turning up louder! You got the gig, which suggests you may be doing what the management requires.

Oh, and don't take prolonged jazz solos, unless you're a guitarist playing to a guitar club. Even then, don't kid yourself. They're just pretending interest until it's THEIR turn.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.