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How do you call these chords in letter notation correctly?

First: supposedly Asus2?

-0-

-0-

-2-

-2-

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-x-

Second: like B or Bm with open 1st and 2nd strings

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-0-

-4-

-4-

-2-

-x-

Third: like Db or Dbm again with two open strings

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-0-

-6-

-6-

-4-

-x-

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    It doesn't matter whether strings are open or not. All that matters is the notes that are sounding and a little bit their order from lowest to highest. – Todd Wilcox Aug 20 '17 at 20:27
2

I would call the first chord, A-E-A-B-E, an Asus2, since the 3rd (C♯) is omitted, and there is a 2nd (B) included in the spelling.

The second chord could be a called a Bsus4 chord: B-F♯-B-B-E. Again, the 3rd (D♯) is omitted, and the 4th (E) is included.

Given a root of D♭, the final chord is a D♭m7: D♭-A♭-D♭-C♭-F♭, with a minor 3rd (F♭) and a minor 7th (C♭). Note that here F♭ is used instead of the enharmonic spelling E, and C♭ is used instead of the enharmonic spelling B. But it is more likely that this would be called a C♯m7 in practice. This chord is likely to be found in context as a ii7, a vi7, or a i7 chord; for a D♭m7 these would belong to the keys of C♭, F♭, and D♭ minor, respectively. But these keys are more likely to be written as their enharmonic equivalents B, E, and C♯ minor. In these keys the chord would be a C♯m7: C♯-G♯-C♯-B-E.

  • @ToddWilcox-- Thanks for the edit; I guess my fingers got tired of Ctrl-Shift-U somewhere along the line.... :) – David Bowling Aug 20 '17 at 23:11
  • That third chord is far more commonly seen as C#m7 - C# G# C# B E. Especially amongst guitarists - who, according to several guitar sites, only use #, as b apparently don't exist in guitar world... – Tim Aug 21 '17 at 6:20
  • @Tim-- of course; I got sidetracked by OP's mention of this as some kind of Db chord and should have paid more attention. Updated answer; thanks for the catch ;) I never understood why guitarists don't like flats; this must be guitarists who don't read, since they are all over the place in sheet music.... – David Bowling Aug 21 '17 at 10:48
  • The only reason I can come up with is that any note is easy to make sharp on guitar - move a fret higher, whereas to flatten an open string note involves moving to a lower string. Tricky... – Tim Aug 21 '17 at 11:00
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    Ah, you've got me now. But which way?? – Tim Aug 21 '17 at 11:19

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