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I just watched a video about music theory and the guy in the video sounded as if there is a difference between

AMaj7 which would A C# E G

And something he called an "A major dominant seven"

Is there a difference?

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    If learning music properly is in any way important you: Get hold of a good, reliable theory book - check Amazon and look at the reviews. Or get yourself a teacher - or both. Do not rely on random online videos for your music education.
    – Stinkfoot
    Oct 31, 2017 at 4:55

3 Answers 3

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Amaj7 is an A major chord with a maj7 note attached. A C# E G#. A dom7 (A7) is A major with a flat 7. A C# E G. Am7 is an A minor chord with a minor 7 attached. A C E G. Am maj7 is A minor chord with a major 7 attached. A C E G#. That's about it. Maybe post a link to the video - which sounds spurious!

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  • That's about it. Indeed. Too bad I can't up-vote again now....
    – Stinkfoot
    Nov 25, 2017 at 3:15
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We're in a morass of terminology here!

In terms of describing stand-alone chords, A major (A, C#, E) is just called A.

A7 is A, C#, E, G.

This is sometimes called a 'dominamt 7th' chord type, though it isn't being the dominant of anything at the moment. It could be the first chord of a Blues in A major. It could be the dominant 7th chord in D major (or minor). It could be II7 in G major (yes, it can include a note not in the G scale and still be 'in G major'. Latch on to that idea folks, you'll need it a lot). It could be all sorts of other things. A substitute dominant-function chord in Db major perhaps.

Amaj7 is A, C#, E, G#. The 'major' part of the name refers to the major 7th, G#.

The dominant 7th OF A major is E7. But now we're talking about what a chord DOES, not what it IS.

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  • Question: it isn't being the dominant of anything at the moment - doesn't the structure of the chord make it dominant with respect to itself because of the tritone separating C# from G, which needs to resolve? Or is that only relevant with respect to another contrasting chord or note?
    – Stinkfoot
    Nov 25, 2017 at 3:12
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    A dom7 type chord doesn't HAVE to resolve. The classic example of it not resolving is a Blues progression. Dominant is as dominant does.
    – Laurence
    Nov 25, 2017 at 12:59
  • OK - I understand what you mean - it's a "dominant type" chord that cannot "DOMINATE" anybody else when it's standing alone. In a blues progression everybody is dominant, so nobody is "dominating" anybody else - they are all peers. :) Tnx.
    – Stinkfoot
    Nov 25, 2017 at 19:18
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Amaj7 is A C# E G

A major dominant seventh starts on the dominant (5th) note of the A major scale, which is E, so it would be E G# B D

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    This is no definition of the dominant 7th chord that I have ever heard. A7 comes from the 5th mode of the D major scale, if you want to think of it as derived from a scale. The chord you describe is E7.
    – user39614
    Nov 24, 2017 at 21:32
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    @LaurencePayne - how is this correct? Amaj7 would be A C# E G# - the chord indicated is A7, not Amaj7, as Tim said. Am I missing something?
    – Stinkfoot
    Nov 25, 2017 at 2:56
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    A major dominant seventh - That's a contradiction in terms. A Major 7th is not a Dominant 7th . In the key of A we have a Major 7th chord:3rd is C# and 7th is G# - both the 3rd and the 7th are Major intervals; a Dominant 7th chord (the default 7th chord) 3rd is C# and 7th is G - 3rd is a major interval and 7th is minor -which makes it Dominant because of the tritone separating the M3 from m7; A Minor 7th chord C is the 3rd, G is the 7th - both the 3rd and the 7th are Minor. (I'll leave out diminished for now...)
    – Stinkfoot
    Nov 25, 2017 at 3:07
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    'This is correct' referred to @David Bowling's comment. Not to the main answer.
    – Laurence
    Nov 25, 2017 at 13:00
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    I see we agree, then!
    – Laurence
    Nov 25, 2017 at 15:51

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