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I am a 26 years old male, from South Asia. I love music so much, and I can sing good. I cannot play any instrument. I love the sound of piano.

Is it possible for me to learn piano very very good if I start at my age 26 ?

How long will it take for me to learn to play piano very very good (P:S: Using Youtube tutorial videos as a guide) ? (by "very very good" I mean like the musician playing piano in the following video links)

These are some videos of a musician from my country, who is the best musician (singer, composer, music arranger, pianist) in my country. In these videos, he is playing piano pieces. Please watch these videos. How long would it take for me to learn and play those pieces with ease ?

closed as too broad by MattPutnam, Richard, jdjazz, Dom Dec 20 '17 at 14:46

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    If you love music and want to learn how to play an instrument, get started now. It is pointless to worry about whether it is too late. You will likely need to play for several years to get any good, even if you have an aptitude for it. Most players who play long enough to get good play because they need to play, so get started, know that it will be hard going; if you need to keep at it, you will, and that will be the only thing that really matters. – David Bowling Dec 17 '17 at 4:51
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    Yes. 5-10 years. But only do it if you don’t care whether you ever become good or not. If you love it even when you are terrible, then you’re doing the right thing. – Todd Wilcox Dec 17 '17 at 6:27
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Set your goal to be to have fun -- not to be Habib Wahid

Like David said in the comments, It'll tae several years to get any good, regardless of when you start. If you start learning with the goal of playing Chopin, you will get discouraged. Instead, learn what is at your level -- and enjoy it. There's a lot of excellent music that you will play before you're able to play more advanced stuff, so don't give up on those experiences because you won't be able to jump to the difficult things that you have your heart set on.

I agree more or less with the timeline Todd set forward in his comment, although I would note that it depends very much on time invested, more with regularity than a few sessions of pure willpower and then weeks of nothing. The impressive thing about that pianist is not that he can play all of those notes quickly, but that he can play the notes quickly and well.

Playing by ear is entirely a learnable skill, and the best way to start is to be able to audiate (google it) and sing what you "hear," and then make the connection between the notes you hear and the muscles that push the right key on the piano. Learning solfege and stuff will help too, but the main thing is just to be intimate with your instrument and to practice doing it a lot. Help lead worship at church, find some people to jam with, all of those things will help improve your ear.

One last note -- Youtube is ok, but the very best is a private teacher. Even if you only splurge on lessons intermittently, having an expert to critique your technique (I make little rhyme, no?) will be a huge asset to your playing.

Most importantly:

HAVE FUN THO

  • if I learn to play some good music pieces on the piano, does it mean that I am a good pianist or good piano player? – danver Dec 17 '17 at 12:44
  • @danver It's unclear to me what you envision the distinction to be. If a pianist is someone who is not only technically skilled but also musical, whereas a piano player is someone who can simply play back pieces he's learned, then it depends. Musicality comes mainly from playing an instrument, but also from listening to good music, practicing ear training, and developing a sense of what sounds "good." – General Nuisance Dec 18 '17 at 19:18
  • ohhh....I mean like what u meant -- "a pianist is someone who is not only technically skilled but also musical, whereas a piano player is someone who can simply play back pieces he's learned," .. Will it be fine if I buy a 61 keys piano keyboard rather than 88 keys? – danver Dec 18 '17 at 19:24
  • @danver You can play music on whatever you want! Keep in mind it will feel quite different than a normal piano, but it's not the sort of difference that you can't adjust to after a few minutes. The important thing is: Start. – General Nuisance Dec 19 '17 at 6:48
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Yes, while an adult beginner may have left it too late to achieve full concert-pianist virtuosity, the sort of music you seem interested in is not technically demanding. You can achieve that level of dexterity in a few years.

Whether it is within you to CREATE this sort of music is another matter. Start off by copying. And PLEASE don't try to do it all from YouTube lessons. Get a teacher, or at least make friends with an accomplished player who can mentor you. There are just so many ways you can work yourself into a dead end...

  • if I learn to play some good music pieces on the piano, does it mean that I am a good pianist or good piano player? – danver Dec 17 '17 at 14:53
  • Same thing. Unless YOU feel there's a distinction. What is it? – Laurence Payne Dec 17 '17 at 14:58
  • and, I cannot afford a piano. My budget is 80 Euro. If I learn using a Electronic piano keyboard, will I also be able to play real piano? – danver Dec 17 '17 at 14:59
  • You might have to spend a little more than 80 Euro on an instrument, unless you're VERY lucky on the second-hand market. You really want an imitation piano with 88 notes and a weighted keyboard, not a 'home keyboard' sort of toy. – Laurence Payne Dec 18 '17 at 0:12
  • Will it be fine if I buy a 61 keys piano keyboard rather than 88 keys? – danver Dec 19 '17 at 1:02

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