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It is a piano technique question.

How to play technically right D(Eighth note) and C(Half note)? Start together or C goes after a little delay? (in the first measure).

The same for the accord E+G and D in the second measure.

Thanks!

The sample

  • Pretty sure a very similar question came up a couple of weeks ago. – Tim Jan 21 '18 at 12:43
  • Look, the devil is in the details (for a newbie like me), in older question notes "touch" each other, so they look like an accord (for me), in my question there is a blank space between notes, so it is not that obvious. I would not mark that as a duplicate. But...whatever.. – Vladimir Nabokov Jan 21 '18 at 19:10
  • The notes are actually played together, even though there's a tiny space between them, so it's a duplicate. Please do not be put off staying with the site - there are many interesting problems solved here - including yours. – Tim Jan 21 '18 at 19:27
  • I'm not intending to leave the site. I just tell you that the "touching"- "not touching" was a great difference for me, before I asked the question. Now I know - this is the same. But the question was asked before this knowledge materialized. Second, I see that in all SE forums: these hard rules are counter-productive. For a specialist N questions might look the same, for newbies each may produce another source for information, comments, little details, all that creates a necessary info. But, whatever... – Vladimir Nabokov Jan 21 '18 at 19:36
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All of these note pairs have to played simultaneously. The horizontal offset is just added to avoid printing note heads over each other. (As a rule, when notes sound after another, the heads will be farther apart than this - at the very least they would be no horizontal overlap.)

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    If the heads were merely further apart, with no rest (or perhaps a preceding dotted note etc.) to define its rhythmic position, it would be merely sloppy engraving. Note and rest values define the rhythm. Position on the page should reinforce the information, but, in standard notation, cannot change it. – Laurence Payne Jan 21 '18 at 15:17

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