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My name is Stavros and I am 16 years old. My voice changed around 12-13 and my voice stopped breaking around 14. I've always wanted to sing. My current range is B1-F#5. However, I flip into falsetto around F4-F#4. On a very good day I can hit a chest G4 briefly but most days it will crack. I want to be able to sing songs sung by tenors or high baritones (chest voice going up to B4 and C5). I want to be able to expand my chest voice. Am I stuck like this? Or can I change how I am and make my chest voice register wider so I can do higher belts? BTW I am starting vocal lessons in a week. My lessons will be weekly.

Thanks guys

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No, you are not stuck like this. You’re voice is only just beginning to develop. Your voice won’t reach full maturity until around your mid-30’s, in about 20 more years. That’s a long time.

Your voice will change naturally over time. One of the biggest mistakes people make is singing music that doesn’t fit their voice. If it doesn’t fit your voice, either change the key or change the song. Straining to sing too high or low can damage the voice.

Your range, resonance, and technique will improve with lessons. Belting is a technique specific to musical theater and I highly recommend you DO NOT do it until your voice is more mature, say in 6-10 years.

Remember that at 16, you are QUITE young and that you’re voice is just starting to mature.

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You go where your vocal teacher and common sense admits you to go. Singing higher means stretching your vocal folds across moving parts of your larynx. With a male voice, your larynx had a significant growth spurt few years ago and will take decades to harden out (think of the growth areas of cartilege as similar to a freshly molted insect). Putting large strains on it while this hasn't happened completely is a recipe for damage. In particular as a male with a low voice (B1 is already lower than any Western bass part), the mechanics (long vocal folds and big leverage on the larynx) do not bode well for healthy high singing.

So I strongly recommend educating your musical interests on material you might perform yourself in a manner satisfying to you eventually.

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