4

These are from For Whom the Bell Tolls drums:

enter image description here

I understand the sixteen-notes triplets, but the other 3 above them confuses me. The first sixteen-note of the triplets would be in the same location as a normal eighth-note, or in the location of the last note of a triplet (like the bass note in the 2nd pattern)?

  • 1
    'Tripletception' (I just made that up). The sixteenth triplet takes the place of an eighth note, which together with the quarter note sits in a triplet. Thus, the quarter takes up 2/3rds of a normal quarter note value, and the three notes in the triplet each take up 1/9th of a quarter note value. Thus, together the larger triplet takes up one quarter note (2/3 + 1/9 + 1/9 + 1/9 = 1 quarter note). If you want to practice this slowly, you can count the quarter note as 6/9, with the three sixteenth notes as 1/9 each. – Remy Feb 2 '18 at 3:21
  • @Remy Why not turn that into an answer? – Richard Feb 2 '18 at 3:42
10

Let me focus on the first rhythm only:

original rhythm

The sixteenth triplet takes the place of an eighth note, which together with the quarter note sits in a triplet. Thus, the quarter takes up 2/3rds of a normal quarter note value, and the three notes in the triplet each take up 1/9th of a quarter note value. Thus, together the larger triplet takes up one quarter note (2/3 + 1/9 + 1/9 + 1/9 = 1 quarter note). This reading corresponds to the following equivalent notation:

rewritten using nonuplets

If you want to practice this slowly, you can count the quarter note as 6/9, with the three sixteenth notes as 1/9 each.

Alternatively, you can start by replacing the three sixteenths by a single eighth note, and playing the outer triplet rhythm first:

enter image description here

Then you replace the single eighth note by a sixteenth note triplet. This second interpretation is closer to the genesis of the rhythm, and presumably the reason the notation with embedded triplets (as opposed to the alternative one with nonuplets) was chosen.

0

I would say the time signature is 4/4. The first 3 (quarter) beats of Drum Pat. 1 are in triplets (3 eighths within each beat). The first 2 beats have another triplet on the 3rd eighth. Sounds more complicated than it is.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.