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If the fat E string becomes F then what will be the other strings be?

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    As Tim says, it's kind of up to you (it depends why you're tuning up the low E string) - bear in mind that if you want to just raise every string by a semitone, you'll be increasing the tension on the neck a bit - using a capo is the standard solution if you only want to do this temporarily, – topo morto May 8 '18 at 8:03
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    Please also note there are different tunings: for example drop D, where you tune down 1 tone only the low E string. There are also open tunings (for example open G) which allow you to play with slide or play certain chords easier. Now you know the keywords, google it up ;-) – Wookie88 May 8 '18 at 8:05
  • If you ask for a guitar (not easily to recognize for me), then why not use that tag? – guidot May 8 '18 at 12:48
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It depends what tuning you want. Assuming the guitar will be playable in a standard way - chord shapes etc., the same as normal tuning, the notes will be F, Bb, Eb, Ab, C and top F. All up a semitone from where they were. They will feel tighter than previously, but there won't be a great deal of difference in tension on the neck, assuming the strings are as previous, although on cheaper guitars, or badly set up ones, it could be slightly harder to play.

  • It might be worth mentioning a capo as an alternative. – badjohn May 8 '18 at 15:07
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Without understanding the background of the question more, I can only give limited answer.

If you are wondering what happens to other string if you change the fat E string to F, it really depends on the type of guitar. If the guitar is an electric guitar with tension controlling lever, whammy bar, it will affect other strings. If it is a fixed bridge block - E to F on one string is not going to affect other strings much. Acoustic and Classical guitars will be the same as fixed bridge guitar - other strings will be fine.

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