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I play the piano casually in my spare time, and was given lessons from when I was 7 up until about 17. When I stopped lessons, I was playing at around RCM grade level 9, but due to school time constraints, I haven't been able to regularly play in around two and a half years. I'd like to get back into things, but would like to pay more attention to learning "properly" this time (I was always lazy about practicing scales, sightreading, and learning theory, I'd always want to just get to the fun stuff).

I'd like to get back into it now that I have some time on my hands,but I'd like to get a better grasp on my fundamentals this go around. Does anyone have any resources that they would recommend looking into? Particularly for sight-reading, theory, and composition.

Thanks!

closed as off-topic by Richard, David Bowling, Tim, Dom Jul 28 '18 at 18:20

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I was in the same situation as you not long ago. To get me back on track, this website was a very good start, it provides the very basic informations you need to know in order to practice efficiently.

If you want to get more serious, I highly recommend this series of ebook written by Graham Fitch, a concert pianist. It might be what you are looking for, because it seems like you want good fundamentals but practicing scales mindlessly won't get you anywhere, even if you are very dedicated to it. Theses ressources provide insights about how theses technical exercices should be approached to give optimal results, aswell as the overall strategy one needs to get the best out of his practice. If you are already experienced but you feel like you lack proper training it might be a good idea to learn about practicing efficiently before actualy practicing.

If you want to study harmony, this book has every thing you need to know inside, is very comprehensive and has exercices to help you integrate the concepts. It is basicaly a must have if you want to study theory on your own. You will get tones of free informations by browsing the internet, but theroy is not easy and you will get lost if you don't have a solid backup book... Or a teacher.

There are also sightreading websites like piano marvel which might interess you. But as far as I know, the only thing you need to do to improve at sight reading is to practice :)

Finaly, you don't mention ear training in your question, maybe because you already have a good ear. If it is not the case, I suggest incorporating it into your practice, it is an essential skill to develop ! Plus there are many apps that make it fun and easy :)

Have fun playing the piano again !

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There's no way round the fact that learning 'properly' takes a teacher.

  • Totally fair, I don't expect to absorb as much as I did during the years of lessons, I was just looking for a pointer in the right direction. I'm well past the basics and the intermediate techniques (RCM tops out at grade 10, I had made it to 9 before my lessons stopped), I was more just looking for any tools/programs that would help me brush up on some of the stuff I may not have payed sufficient attention to the first go around – Platytude Jul 28 '18 at 3:28

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