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I've been hunting for a violin, and am wondering: do you find that response (how easy it is to articulate) is inversely proportionate to how well it rings? Does this difference somewhat go down as price goes up? Thank you!

closed as too broad by Carl Witthoft, David Bowling, Tim, Dom Aug 27 '18 at 1:28

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    As an instrument dealer I've played many instruments in various quality ranges and I haven't seen a correlation between response and resonance. The spectrum of available instruments is vast, I think Carl's answer has the crux of it. – Alphonso Balvenie Aug 20 '18 at 4:43
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Unfortunately, the answer is "it depends." If you're a skilled player and can tell the difference between a $50,000 (US) and a $500,000 instrument, you'll be looking not only for response and resonance, but on the shape and flavor of the resonances. Top players often have different (expensive) bows depending on whether they want fast, bouncy response for one piece or deep , languid projection for another piece.

If you're in the sub-$10,000 range, you may find yourself making some tradeoffs depending on what kind of music you favor (or whether you can tell the difference at all). Further, a skilled luthier can adjust the soundpost and bridge position (or swap in a different bride) and drastically change the sound of a given axe.

My seasoned advice is: play a bunch of violins, and then take the 3 or 4 favorites to your teacher and get unbiased feedback as to their quality and how they fit your playing style.

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